Comments (0)

The NYPD Tapes: The Village Voice's Series on Adrian Schoolcraft by Graham Rayman

In 2010, Village Voice reporter Graham Rayman obtained digital audio recordings from Police Officer Adrian Schoolcraft, an eight-year veteran of the NYPD. These tapes revealed the inner-workings of Bed-Stuy's 81st Precinct, a place where bosses threatened street cops if they didn't make their quotas of arrests and stop-and-frisks and told them not to take certain robbery reports in order to manipulate crime statistics.

Astoundingly, these tapes were just the beginning.

Stories found
  1. The NYPD Tapes: Inside Bed-Stuy's 81st Precinct
    Investigations
    Graham Rayman's first story on Adrian Schoolcraft and his recordings of the NYPD's 81st precinct.
    Published:
  2. The NYPD Tapes, Part 2: Ghost Town
    Investigations
    Graham Rayman's second installment, in which the Bed-Stuy street cops are ordered to turn the neighborhood into a "ghost town."
    Published:
  3. NYPD Tapes, Part 3: A Detective Comes Forward About Downgraded Sexual Assaults
    Investigations
    Part 3 of the Voice's series examines how a series of sexual assault-robberies in Washington Heights were downgraded to misdemeanors, allowing a sexual predator to remain at large for two months.
    Published:
  4. NYPD Tapes, Part 4: The WhistleBlower, Adrian Schoolcraft
    Investigations
    Schoolcraft wanted his bosses to know about NYPD misconduct. So in turn, they put him in a mental ward.
    Published:
  5. NYPD Tapes, Part 5: The Corroboration
    Investigations
    At the same time NYPD whistleblower Adrian Schoolcraft was secretly recording his supervisors in a Brooklyn precinct, an officer named Adil Polanco was doing the same thing a borough away in the Bronx.
    Published:
  6. The NYPD Tapes Confirmed
    Investigations
    The report police hid for nearly two years that corroborates our investigation and vindicates Adrian Schoolcraft, the whistleblower the NYPD tried to destroy.
    Published:
  7. "Right to Remain Silent": The NYPD Tapes on NPR's This American Life
    Radio
    Graham Rayman and Adrian Schoolcraft on This American Life, discussing The NYPD Tapes. (From September 10, 2010)
    Published:
My Voice Nation Help
1 comments

From the Print Edition

The Weed Issue: Like, a <I>Village Voice</I> Special Report, Man The Weed Issue: Like, a Village Voice Special Report, Man

In this week's Village Voice, we look at marijuana in New York City and the state through four stories, just in time for that unofficial marijuana holiday, April 20, or… More >>

Asylum Insanity Asylum Insanity

Every day at airports and border crossings around the country, dozens of asylum seekers arrive fleeing death and persecution in their native countries. They are welcomed to the United States… More >>

Underground Cake Boss: Bettina Banayan's Subway Performance Art Infuriates and Overjoys Underground Cake Boss: Bettina Banayan's Subway Performance Art Infuriates and Overjoys

By the time Bettina Banayan pulled out the meat cleaver, it was clear something weird was about to happen. By now, the 12-minute video of Banayan chopping onions on the subway… More >>

27 Ways to Better Yourself This Summer in NYC

Art Frederick Law Olmsted, who designed Central Park, called it "a democratic development of the highest significance." But it has its aesthetic points, too, and you can learn how best to… More >>

With Autism Diagnoses on the Rise, New York universities Offer Students Help With Autism Diagnoses on the Rise, New York universities Offer Students Help

Autism diagnoses are booming: More than 1 percent of all children are now estimated to be somewhere on the spectrum for the developmental disorder, according to the Centers for Disease… More >>

How a Group of NYC High Schools Ditched Most Regents Exams -- and Created Better College Students How a Group of NYC High Schools Ditched Most Regents Exams -- and Created Better College Students

Of all the students in New York City public high schools, about 60 percent end up with diplomas. And of those graduates, about 60 percent — roughly one in every… More >>

Loading...