Tragedy, as Aristotle defined it, “is an imitation of an action that is serious, complete, and of a certain magnitude.” It’s difficult to locate Cynthia Hopkins—a playwright, actor, dancer, singer, and multi-instrumentalist—in that description, as her works, however poignant, can seem playful, fragmentary, and deceptively slight. Hopkins creates singular, diaphanous performance pieces whose subjects range from amnesia to art-making to space travel. In her new play, The Truth: A Tragedy, Hopkins remains more or less earthbound as she portrays the death of her father, who appears on video encased in heavy spectacles and bereft of several teeth. This theatrical valediction, directed by D.J. Mendel, asks audiences to redefine what tragedy means today. Take that, Aristotle.
Tuesdays-Sundays, 7:30 p.m. Starts: May 6. Continues through May 30, 2010

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