News & Politics

Judge Halts “Broadway Bomb” Long-Board Race Because, Well, “You Could Die”

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UPDATE: Broadway Bomb organizer tells the Voice he’s canceled the race, says he “doesn’t like jail.”

For the past 12 years, more than 1,000 skaters take long-boards and gone weaving through traffic on Broadway in a race dubbed the Broadway Bomb.

This year’s race is scheduled for tomorrow — but a judge has gone and pissed on the parade.

New York State Supreme Court Justice Geoffrey Wright ruled in favor of a city-backed injunction to halt this year’s race. And there’s a reason: as organizers of the race note in their slogan, “you could die.”

The race traditionally starts at 116th Street and goes all the way to
the bull on Wall Street. Participants pass through 150 intersections,
including Columbus Circle and Times Square.

According to the
attorney who filed the injunction on behalf of the City, “during past
races, the riders have skated in massive group formations taking up the entire roadway and sidewalk, not leaving any room for vehicular traffic or pedestrians to pass.

The riders
have also engaged in reckless and dangerous behavior such as failing to
stop for red lights, cutting off and weaving through moving vehicles and
pedestrians, grabbing onto passing vehicles and bicycles so as to be
propelled by the vehicles and bicycles, and instructing vehicles which
have the right of way to stop so they can pass through intersections.
None of these past events sought or were granted a City “parade permit.”

Organizers didn’t seek a parade permit again this year, which is one of the reasons Wright cites in ruling to ban the race.

In
addition to halting the race, Wright banned “any similar race.” In
other words, organizers can’t just call the race something else and then
go bombing down Broadway.

The judge also is requiring organizers
to contact each of the 1,800 people expected to participate and tell them the race is cancelled. He also
doesn’t want any “flash mobs” gathering as a result of the race.

Organizers
didn’t immediately respond to our request for comment — we want to
know if they still plan to run the race. We’ll let you know if we hear
back.

See the judge’s ruling here.

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