Revolution, Girl-Style—Shhh!

RIOT GRRRL MOVES OUT OF THE STREETS AND INTO THE LIBRARY

Though Hanna's archive is growing fast, Darms warns that the Fales collection will take some time to build. "I think about this in five-year increments," she says. Hanna did experience some qualms about parting with her file cabinet ("Knowing it wasn't doing anyone any good sitting in my basement was a big motivator, though") and its trove of photos, set lists, and zines. And she has, for the moment, retained her journals and correspondences. Yet, she says, she felt pleasure and relief upon donating: "I had realized that before I could truly move on with my work, I had to make peace with my former projects," she says. "Part of that included making sure they were archived properly. I am horribly nervous about feminist erasure, which has a huge impact on everything I do."

NYU archivist Lisa Darms with her prize acquisition
David Wentworth
NYU archivist Lisa Darms with her prize acquisition

Happily for Hanna, Riot Grrrl shows little sign of effacement: Macmillan recently issued Marisa Meltzer's Girl Power: The Nineties Revolution in Music, and Harper Perennial will soon publish Sara Marcus's Girls to the Front: The True Story of the Riot Grrrl Revolution. Also, as Freedman notes, "Right now, Riot Grrrl is definitely going to grad school. There are a lot of women in library school and in PhD programs who seem to be researching Riot Grrrl." Hanna, who was herself inspired by books recounting '60s and '70s feminist activism, hopes that "this archive will spawn some great books of its own."

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