Sun

1/21

Mon

1/22

Tue

1/23

Wed

1/24

Thu

1/25

Fri

1/26

Sat

1/27

Today

Sun

1/21

Dance

Malpaso Dance Company

Photo: Judy Ondrey

The Joyce has taken this ten-member, five-year-old Cuban contemporary dance troupe, whose name means something like misstep, under its wing, which has led to the commissioning of new works by several North American choreographers. Malpaso’s winter season includes the New York premiere of Aszure Barton’s Indomitable Waltz, to music by Alexander Balanescu, Michael Nyman, and Nils Frahm, as well as Face the Torrent, a new dance by Emmy nominee Sonya Tayeh, and a 2013 piece, Ocaso, by the troupe’s artistic director and resident choreographer, Osnel Delgado.

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Dances by Very Young Choreographers

Ballet classes for kids are a dime a dozen, but finding really good training in contemporary dance — how to think, as well as how to move — for young students is a challenge. Ellen Robbins is one of the rare people who do this well, and every winter she stages programs of her charges’ choreography. This week, in addition to three concerts by her current students, she’s offering an evening of work by people who’ve studied with her, as far back as 1989, and are still working in the modern-dance field. On the bill for that Friday-night alumni show are Chanda Cragnotti, Morgana Cragnotti, Lina Dahbour, Adriane Erdos, Krista Jansen, Emma Lee, Leah Newman, Amelia Sanders, Anna Sperber, and Lucy Weisner.

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Split Bill at Triskelion

On a quiet corner in Greenpoint, this useful incubator space, which opens onto convivial courtyards, offers four troupes showing new, long-form pieces, spread over four nights with each ensemble performing twice. On opening night, Falcon Dance presents a work in progress exploring the migration patterns of birds, and shares the program with Kizuna Dance, a Japanese-inflected project directed by Cameron McKinney, premiering his new Koibito, inspired by the plight of Japanese salarymen and deploying street dance and contemporary floor work. The second bill spotlights Falcon and Jessica Reidy’s Treeline Dance Works, a performance co-op, in Lift. On Saturday, the Achievements present Vital Signs, featuring Renee Gerardo and Jenny Pommiss, and share the bill with Treeline; on Sunday Kizuna and the Achievements reprise their projects.

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Mon

1/22

Film

Fashion in Film

Photo: Zoolander (2001) / Courtesy Paramount

The fashion industry, simultaneously glamorous and cutthroat, naturally lends itself to onscreen intrigue: There’s a distinct pleasure to be had in watching characters wear opulent costumes we wouldn’t dare try on ourselves in real life. Phantom Thread, Paul Thomas Anderson’s emotionally prickly tale of a mid-century London couturier, has emerged as the most recent arrival in the cinema’s pantheon of fashion-world allure. With the movie now playing at Brooklyn’s Alamo Drafthouse in glorious 70mm, staff programmer Cristina Cacioppo has assembled a characteristically playful companion lineup of nine other films that also represent the vast potential of fabulous outfits to captivate audiences. (The series began earlier this month and continues through the end of January.)

Abbey Bender

 

Tue

1/23

Dance

New York City Ballet

Photo: Paul Kolnik

The children are nestled all snug in their wee little beds, and the mice and snowflakes have been shelved for another season, but life at New York City Ballet goes on despite upheaval at the top, this winter celebrating the centennial of choreographer Jerome Robbins, along with dance odyssey, a new dance by corps de ballet member Peter Walker, and Alexei Ratmansky’s Russian Seasons. Opening week toggles between Balanchine favorites and new dances by Troy Schumacher, Gianna Reisen, Angelin Preljocaj, and Justin Peck. Coming in time for Valentine’s Day are two weeks of Peter Martins’s stark, Scandinavian Romeo and Juliet. Saturday, the company founder’s birthday, packs in two all-Balanchine programs.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Performance

Dean Moss

The world premiere of Dean Moss’s greatly anticipated seventy-minute Petra, described as a “masochistic autobiographical meditation on desire,” and inspired by Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s film The Bitter Tears of Petra von Kant, features a cast of female immigrants well known in the downtown dance community, including Mina Nishimura, Sari Nordman, Kaneza Schaal, Samita Sinha, and Paz Tanjuaquio. Collaborating on video are Julia Cumming, Cassie Mey, Marya Warshaw, and Asher Woodworth; ten other artists contribute to the production, one of the last in this year’s Coil festival at the newly reopened and renamed Performance Space New York.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Kader Attou–Company Accrorap

This French-Algerian troupe of eleven male hip-hop dancers makes its U.S. debut with The Roots. Directed and choreographed by “dance smuggler” Kader Attou, it combines hip-hop with circus, contemporary dance, and graphic arts. Blending his own Mediterranean culture with the French accents of the Centre Chorégraphic National in La Rochelle, which he’s been directing for the past ten years, Attou takes New York–born hip-hop and blends it with a host of other influences to create this new piece, which has an original sound score by Régis Ballet and Diaphane. Meet the director and the dancers at a post-curtain chat on Wednesday evening.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Wed

1/24

Dance

Kader Attou–Company Accrorap

Photo: João Garcia

This French-Algerian troupe of eleven male hip-hop dancers makes its U.S. debut with The Roots. Directed and choreographed by “dance smuggler” Kader Attou, it combines hip-hop with circus, contemporary dance, and graphic arts. Blending his own Mediterranean culture with the French accents of the Centre Chorégraphic National in La Rochelle, which he’s been directing for the past ten years, Attou takes New York–born hip-hop and blends it with a host of other influences to create this new piece, which has an original sound score by Régis Ballet and Diaphane. Meet the director and the dancers at a post-curtain chat on Wednesday evening.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Performance

Dean Moss

The world premiere of Dean Moss’s greatly anticipated seventy-minute Petra, described as a “masochistic autobiographical meditation on desire,” and inspired by Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s film The Bitter Tears of Petra von Kant, features a cast of female immigrants well known in the downtown dance community, including Mina Nishimura, Sari Nordman, Kaneza Schaal, Samita Sinha, and Paz Tanjuaquio. Collaborating on video are Julia Cumming, Cassie Mey, Marya Warshaw, and Asher Woodworth; ten other artists contribute to the production, one of the last in this year’s Coil festival at the newly reopened and renamed Performance Space New York.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Thu

1/25

Film

Memories of Underdevelopment

Photo: Courtesy Film Forum

Cuban director Tomas Gutierrez Alea’s Memories of Underdevelopment, from 1968, is one of the greatest pictures ever made, and it’s screening in a new restoration at Film Forum that you shouldn’t miss. Don’t be surprised, however, if what you’re watching doesn’t always look brand new, or slick, or clean. Though fictional, Alea’s film mixes a variety of forms, incorporating both documentary footage shot by the director on the streets of Havana as well as archival historical images. As such, it’s also often purposefully grainy, washed out, imperfect. Alternating between immediacy and reflection, fantasy and honesty, lyricism and horror, Memories of Underdevelopment feels like it’s being created before our very eyes.

Bilge Ebiri

Performance

Dean Moss

The world premiere of Dean Moss’s greatly anticipated seventy-minute Petra, described as a “masochistic autobiographical meditation on desire,” and inspired by Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s film The Bitter Tears of Petra von Kant, features a cast of female immigrants well known in the downtown dance community, including Mina Nishimura, Sari Nordman, Kaneza Schaal, Samita Sinha, and Paz Tanjuaquio. Collaborating on video are Julia Cumming, Cassie Mey, Marya Warshaw, and Asher Woodworth; ten other artists contribute to the production, one of the last in this year’s Coil festival at the newly reopened and renamed Performance Space New York.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Kader Attou–Company Accrorap

This French-Algerian troupe of eleven male hip-hop dancers makes its U.S. debut with The Roots. Directed and choreographed by “dance smuggler” Kader Attou, it combines hip-hop with circus, contemporary dance, and graphic arts. Blending his own Mediterranean culture with the French accents of the Centre Chorégraphic National in La Rochelle, which he’s been directing for the past ten years, Attou takes New York–born hip-hop and blends it with a host of other influences to create this new piece, which has an original sound score by Régis Ballet and Diaphane. Meet the director and the dancers at a post-curtain chat on Wednesday evening.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Kei Takei

For the third year in a row, Lumberyard Contemporary Performing Arts, an emerging arts facility in Catskill, New York, is taking over space in town to bring us artists too long missing from local stages. Its three-week 2018 Winter Festival opens with Japanese performer Kei Takei, who brings her company Moving Earth Orient Sphere back to this country for the first time in seventeen years. They’ll show us a recent work, LIGHT, Part 44 (Bamboo Forest), a new section of an evolving piece begun in 1969; completing the program will be a solo from LIGHT, Part 8 (1974), another section of Takei’s now-more-than-24-hour-long “dance diary,” a masterwork of probing choreography.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Jessica diMauro

Time, Jessica diMauro has written, “is not kind to women.” Her modern-dance troupe, DiMauro Dance, offers a glimpse at how she deals with this conundrum in I’m Not Done Yet, in which she wonders how timing controls our lives, and how the pressures of a ticking clock manifest physically. Zach Marks provides live music; David Lovett designs the lights; and among the performers are Davon Chance, Crystal Lynn Rodriguez, Najee Stephenson, and Alexandra Williamson.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Catherine Cabeen / Hyphen

Catherine Cabeen’s new seventy-minute project investigates how desires shape our identity and vice versa. Give Me More plays out in three parts: “Glitter in the Gutter,” “The American Koan,” and “…yet again.” The first section is a duet for Cabeen herself and Kristina Berger; the central section involves seven dancers (Cabeen, Nya Bowman, Darby Canessa, Hector Cerna, Sarah Lustbader, Kathryn MacLellan, and Trebien Pollard) and has music by Mark Katsaounis, lighting by Philip Trevino, and two hundred pounds of recycled clothing. The final section’s a solo for the choreographer.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Music

Frank Zappa: Rebel / Respect / Response

Homage will be observed and influences recalibrated when the Lucerne Festival presents Frank Zappa: Rebel / Respect / Response. The two-day modernist hoedown, conducted by Matthias Pintscher and performed by the Lucerne Festival Alumni ensemble (with Tyshawn Sorey providing percussive fireworks), kicks off Thursday with performances of four “serious” Zappa works (including The Perfect Stranger and “Naval Aviation in Art?”), preceded by Olga Neuwirth’s Eleanor. The Austrian composer’s Zappa-influenced montage of blues, Martin Luther King Jr. speeches, and June Jordan’s poetry was inspired, she says, by the brutal Charlie Hebdo attack of 2015, and it features Della Miles singing an uptown version of Billie Holiday. The sophisticated fun continues Friday with more work by Zappa (“Get Whitey,” “G-Spot Tornado,” among others); by Zappa touchstone Edgard Varèse (Intégrales); and by fellow travelers Pierre Boulez (Éclat) and John Zorn (For Your Eyes Only).

Richard Gehr

Fri

1/26

Performance

Dean Moss

The world premiere of Dean Moss’s greatly anticipated seventy-minute Petra, described as a “masochistic autobiographical meditation on desire,” and inspired by Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s film The Bitter Tears of Petra von Kant, features a cast of female immigrants well known in the downtown dance community, including Mina Nishimura, Sari Nordman, Kaneza Schaal, Samita Sinha, and Paz Tanjuaquio. Collaborating on video are Julia Cumming, Cassie Mey, Marya Warshaw, and Asher Woodworth; ten other artists contribute to the production, one of the last in this year’s Coil festival at the newly reopened and renamed Performance Space New York.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Nightlife

Fix Your Hearts or Die: A Pre-Valentine’s Twin Peaks Night

Photo: Photofest

Costumes and cosplay are encouraged at Fix Your Hearts or Die: A Pre-Valentine’s Twin Peaks Night, so why not wrap yourself in garbage bags, grab a log, and embrace the Peaks’ sexy, tragic, and enigmatic pine-scented atmosphere? Angelo Badalamenti’s jazz-pop-electronic score was of course an integral part of the TP experience, so electro trio A Place Both Wonderful and Strange will perform “The Laura Palmer Deviations,” a dark, dissonant re-creation (featuring burlesque badass Liberty Rose) of Laura’s tragic final moments that was commissioned by the David Lynch Foundation. Outsider academic Stef Black will deliver a talk entitled “About the Bunny: On the Screen as Mirror in Twin Peaks,” and the DJ Knifesex (a co-founder of urban witchcraft practitioners New Jack Witch) will transport you to the Road House, lair of enraptured zombie-eyed clubizens.

Richard Gehr

Dance

Kader Attou–Company Accrorap

This French-Algerian troupe of eleven male hip-hop dancers makes its U.S. debut with The Roots. Directed and choreographed by “dance smuggler” Kader Attou, it combines hip-hop with circus, contemporary dance, and graphic arts. Blending his own Mediterranean culture with the French accents of the Centre Chorégraphic National in La Rochelle, which he’s been directing for the past ten years, Attou takes New York–born hip-hop and blends it with a host of other influences to create this new piece, which has an original sound score by Régis Ballet and Diaphane. Meet the director and the dancers at a post-curtain chat on Wednesday evening.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Catherine Cabeen / Hyphen

Catherine Cabeen’s new seventy-minute project investigates how desires shape our identity and vice versa. Give Me More plays out in three parts: “Glitter in the Gutter,” “The American Koan,” and “…yet again.” The first section is a duet for Cabeen herself and Kristina Berger; the central section involves seven dancers (Cabeen, Nya Bowman, Darby Canessa, Hector Cerna, Sarah Lustbader, Kathryn MacLellan, and Trebien Pollard) and has music by Mark Katsaounis, lighting by Philip Trevino, and two hundred pounds of recycled clothing. The final section’s a solo for the choreographer.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Sat

1/27

Performance

Dean Moss

The world premiere of Dean Moss’s greatly anticipated seventy-minute Petra, described as a “masochistic autobiographical meditation on desire,” and inspired by Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s film The Bitter Tears of Petra von Kant, features a cast of female immigrants well known in the downtown dance community, including Mina Nishimura, Sari Nordman, Kaneza Schaal, Samita Sinha, and Paz Tanjuaquio. Collaborating on video are Julia Cumming, Cassie Mey, Marya Warshaw, and Asher Woodworth; ten other artists contribute to the production, one of the last in this year’s Coil festival at the newly reopened and renamed Performance Space New York.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Kader Attou–Company Accrorap

This French-Algerian troupe of eleven male hip-hop dancers makes its U.S. debut with The Roots. Directed and choreographed by “dance smuggler” Kader Attou, it combines hip-hop with circus, contemporary dance, and graphic arts. Blending his own Mediterranean culture with the French accents of the Centre Chorégraphic National in La Rochelle, which he’s been directing for the past ten years, Attou takes New York–born hip-hop and blends it with a host of other influences to create this new piece, which has an original sound score by Régis Ballet and Diaphane. Meet the director and the dancers at a post-curtain chat on Wednesday evening.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Catherine Cabeen / Hyphen

Photo: Pamela Wolff

Catherine Cabeen’s new seventy-minute project investigates how desires shape our identity and vice versa. Give Me More plays out in three parts: “Glitter in the Gutter,” “The American Koan,” and “…yet again.” The first section is a duet for Cabeen herself and Kristina Berger; the central section involves seven dancers (Cabeen, Nya Bowman, Darby Canessa, Hector Cerna, Sarah Lustbader, Kathryn MacLellan, and Trebien Pollard) and has music by Mark Katsaounis, lighting by Philip Trevino, and two hundred pounds of recycled clothing. The final section’s a solo for the choreographer.

Elizabeth Zimmer