Thu

1/18

Fri

1/19

Sat

1/20

Sun

1/21

Mon

1/22

Tue

1/23

Wed

1/24

Today

Thu

1/18

Film

Memories of Underdevelopment

Photo: Courtesy Film Forum

Cuban director Tomas Gutierrez Alea’s Memories of Underdevelopment, from 1968, is one of the greatest pictures ever made, and it’s screening in a new restoration at Film Forum that you shouldn’t miss. Don’t be surprised, however, if what you’re watching doesn’t always look brand new, or slick, or clean. Though fictional, Alea’s film mixes a variety of forms, incorporating both documentary footage shot by the director on the streets of Havana as well as archival historical images. As such, it’s also often purposefully grainy, washed out, imperfect. Alternating between immediacy and reflection, fantasy and honesty, lyricism and horror, Memories of Underdevelopment feels like it’s being created before our very eyes.

Bilge Ebiri

Music

Yams Day

This week, the chart-dominating collective A$AP Mob will come together for the third Yams Day, a commemoration of the late producer A$AP Yams, whose unique productions pushed the group into the spotlight. For this celebration, most of the Mob’s stars will be in the room, including A$AP Ferg, whose recent hit “Plain Jane” is inescapable, and Lil Yachty, the ebullient rapper with a singsong cadence and off-kilter productions. The money raised at the event will go to the Always Strive and Prosper Foundation, a charity founded by Yams’s mother, Tatianna Paulino, to “[provide] young people with accessible and realistic education about substance use and abuse.”

Sophie Weiner

Dance

Split Bill at Triskelion

On a quiet corner in Greenpoint, this useful incubator space, which opens onto convivial courtyards, offers four troupes showing new, long-form pieces, spread over four nights with each ensemble performing twice. On opening night, Falcon Dance presents a work in progress exploring the migration patterns of birds, and shares the program with Kizuna Dance, a Japanese-inflected project directed by Cameron McKinney, premiering his new Koibito, inspired by the plight of Japanese salarymen and deploying street dance and contemporary floor work. The second bill spotlights Falcon and Jessica Reidy’s Treeline Dance Works, a performance co-op, in Lift. On Saturday, the Achievements present Vital Signs, featuring Renee Gerardo and Jenny Pommiss, and share the bill with Treeline; on Sunday Kizuna and the Achievements reprise their projects.

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Music

Jenny Scheinman’s Mischief & Mayhem

Angels and demons frolic about like old pals in Jenny Scheinman’s Mischief & Mayhem, an infectiously inventive and witty quartet led by the soulful California violinist. Long the mistress of a peculiar vein of cosmopolitan Americana, Scheinman explores more combustible environs with Wilco stunt guitarist Nels Cline, the constantly surprising drummer Jim Black, and nimble bassist Todd Sickafoose — longtime associates and frequent collaborators with deep West Coast roots of their own. Scheinman, an emotionally rich font of improvisation, channels dark folk undercurrents, hot-club jazz, and anything else floating through the room. As heard on the foursome’s eponymous 2012 release, elliptic grooves and barely restrained caterwaul duke it out in tunes like “Blues for the Double Vee,” start-stop rocker “The Mite,” and ethnomusicologically playful “Ali Farka Touché.”

Richard Gehr

Music

Big Eyes

Big Eyes began in 2009, as then-21-year-old New Yorker Kait Eldridge began channeling her young-adult rages, hopes, and fears into songs that were sometimes punk, sometimes pop, and often in between. Nearly ten years later, Eldridge and her three bandmates are still releasing garage-pop songs that are often reminiscent of Dum Dum Girls or their inspiration, the Ramones, in their balance of sweetness and a harder rock edge.

Sophie Weiner

Dance

Malpaso Dance Company

The Joyce has taken this ten-member, five-year-old Cuban contemporary dance troupe, whose name means something like misstep, under its wing, which has led to the commissioning of new works by several North American choreographers. Malpaso’s winter season includes the New York premiere of Aszure Barton’s Indomitable Waltz, to music by Alexander Balanescu, Michael Nyman, and Nils Frahm, as well as Face the Torrent, a new dance by Emmy nominee Sonya Tayeh, and a 2013 piece, Ocaso, by the troupe’s artistic director and resident choreographer, Osnel Delgado.

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Music

Keyon Harrold and Friends

When it came to the longtime camaraderie between jazz, hip-hop, and r&b in the year 2017, there wasn’t a realer, clearer vision of that unbreakable bond than The Mugician by Keyon Harrold, the man Don Cheadle called to play the trumpet parts for the actor’s acclaimed performance as Miles Davis in Miles Ahead. For his second album and Legacy Recordings debut, the Ferguson, Missouri–born man with the horn utilizes the time he’s spent recording and touring with the likes of Jay-Z, Beyoncé, David Sanborn, Mary J. Blige, Rihanna, Erykah Badu, Lauryn Hill, Andraé Crouch, Gregory Porter, Maxwell, and so many others into one of the most fluid fusions of this sonic trinity in recent memory. Only a talent like Keyon could come up with music that provides a perfect home for the microphone fiendishness of Big K.R.I.T. and Pharoahe Monch, the blues guitar lightning of Gary Clark Jr., and the golden toasting of current Wailers frontman Josh David Barrett. So when you regard the “and Friends” tease in anticipation of his four-night stand at the Blue Note, keep in mind that it can literally be anyone jumping on that stage to join him and his core band — especially considering that these shows are going down during the final nights of the Winter Jazzfest.

Ron Hart

Music

Hamilton Leithauser

Few things evoke the early ’00s more than the Walkmen lead singer Hamilton Leithauser’s gravelly wail over distorted guitars. Leithauser’s band was a much-loved participant in the scene documented in the new book Meet Me in the Bathroom, an evaluation of the cocaine-and-leather-fueled Lower East Side indie rock of the ’00s. The band broke up in 2014, but Leithauser quickly embarked on a solo career that’s produced music more adventurous than his original project, featuring collaborations with diverse artists like Angel Olsen and Rostam Batmanglij. This week, he begins a residency at the Café Carlyle, a ritzy cabaret that couldn’t be farther from his grungy dive-bar roots.

Sophie Weiner

Film

The Last Picture Show

Infused with nostalgia for a vanishing Texas town, The Last Picture Show is an emblem of an era we’ve come to coat with a nostalgic varnish of our own, that of the myth (more than a little embellished) of post-Woodstock Hollywood, a miracle time when it seemed the elephantine American movie would be rescued by termite artists like Coppola, Lucas, Ashby, and others — including Peter Bogdanovich, whose star was made ascendant with this 1971 breakout hit. Scarcely able to shoulder the burden of that singularly oversold phase of American cinema, The Last Picture Show is at times sweetly overmanaged and fussily edited, but author Larry McMurtry (from whose semi-autobiographical novel the film is adapted) lays out ideal material for Bogdanovich to wrestle with. Chock-a-block with bittersweet, desolate atmosphere, courtesy of cinematographer Robert Surtees and production designer Polly Platt, the movie finds Bogdanovich, in flashes, able to channel the literate sprightliness of Truffaut.

Jaime NChristley

Music

Bound 1-Year Anniversary

Many of New York’s finest dance-music DJs will play at the subterranean Bushwick club Tilt this Thursday to celebrate the first anniversary of Bound, a queer, kink-centric party founded by Brooklyn techno DJ Katie Rex. The DJs span electronic genres from dancehall to house to disco; the Facebook event description announces that “fetish attire & queerness” will be enforced at the door, so if you have no interest in the kink scene, this probably isn’t the party for you. But for queer techno fans, this is by far the best option for your Thursday night.

Sophie Weiner

 

Fri

1/19

Music

Jenny Scheinman’s Mischief & Mayhem

Photo: Benjamin Lozovsky

Angels and demons frolic about like old pals in Jenny Scheinman’s Mischief & Mayhem, an infectiously inventive and witty quartet led by the soulful California violinist. Long the mistress of a peculiar vein of cosmopolitan Americana, Scheinman explores more combustible environs with Wilco stunt guitarist Nels Cline, the constantly surprising drummer Jim Black, and nimble bassist Todd Sickafoose — longtime associates and frequent collaborators with deep West Coast roots of their own. Scheinman, an emotionally rich font of improvisation, channels dark folk undercurrents, hot-club jazz, and anything else floating through the room. As heard on the foursome’s eponymous 2012 release, elliptic grooves and barely restrained caterwaul duke it out in tunes like “Blues for the Double Vee,” start-stop rocker “The Mite,” and ethnomusicologically playful “Ali Farka Touché.”

Richard Gehr

Music

Julius Eastman: That Which Is Fundamental

Julius Eastman, who died sick and homeless in 1990 at age 49, has been enjoying a remarkable second act for the past couple of years. “Julius Eastman: That Which Is Fundamental” celebrates the gay African-American composer’s short, fierce career with a multidisciplinary assault that begins Friday, January 19, with artist-composer Jeremy Toussaint-Baptiste and interdisciplinary artist LaMont Hamilton’s Evil Nigger. The five-part work begins with a messy mockery of blackface and concludes 24 hours later with a ceremonial evocation of Eastman as quintessential trickster. Eastman’s minimalistic music will not be neglected, of course: On January 25, the S.E.M. Ensemble, with whom he toured, will perform Femenine for chamber orchestra and Joy Boy for four treble instruments. Other performances will follow until the series concludes February 3 with the American Contemporary Music Ensemble’s rendition of The Holy Presence of Joan d’Arc for ten cellos.

Richard Gehr

Dance

Split Bill at Triskelion

On a quiet corner in Greenpoint, this useful incubator space, which opens onto convivial courtyards, offers four troupes showing new, long-form pieces, spread over four nights with each ensemble performing twice. On opening night, Falcon Dance presents a work in progress exploring the migration patterns of birds, and shares the program with Kizuna Dance, a Japanese-inflected project directed by Cameron McKinney, premiering his new Koibito, inspired by the plight of Japanese salarymen and deploying street dance and contemporary floor work. The second bill spotlights Falcon and Jessica Reidy’s Treeline Dance Works, a performance co-op, in Lift. On Saturday, the Achievements present Vital Signs, featuring Renee Gerardo and Jenny Pommiss, and share the bill with Treeline; on Sunday Kizuna and the Achievements reprise their projects.

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Music

Royal Trux + Acid Dad

In a recent NPR piece, writer Steve Knopper reports that in the mid-’90s, major labels were so desperate to replicate Nirvana’s success by landing grunge bands that the young group Royal Trux were signed to Virgin Records for $1 million without the label realizing they were only a duo. This led to a mad dash to recruit new band members. For the group, it paid off: Despite their ups and downs with major-label success, Royal Trux’s raw, swaggering experimental rock music has staying power, enough so that their reunion in 2015 generated huge excitement. They play two nights at Market Hotel this week with locals Shilpa Ray and Acid Dad. Expect quite a few graying indie fans in attendance.

Sophie Weiner

Music

Closer + Nine of Swords

The band Nine of Swords opens this week at hardcore group Closer’s album-release party. Though they’re not the headliner, Nine of Swords sticks out due to their unconventional sound — their constantly invigorating music slides among hardcore, post-hardcore, sludge metal, and more. Lead singer Rachel Gordon swings from full-throated screaming to more delicate musing about underwear and social expectations, lending this music an intimacy and a femininity that feels rare in this scene.

Sophie Weiner

Dance

Malpaso Dance Company

The Joyce has taken this ten-member, five-year-old Cuban contemporary dance troupe, whose name means something like misstep, under its wing, which has led to the commissioning of new works by several North American choreographers. Malpaso’s winter season includes the New York premiere of Aszure Barton’s Indomitable Waltz, to music by Alexander Balanescu, Michael Nyman, and Nils Frahm, as well as Face the Torrent, a new dance by Emmy nominee Sonya Tayeh, and a 2013 piece, Ocaso, by the troupe’s artistic director and resident choreographer, Osnel Delgado.

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Julian Barnett

NYU grad Julian Barnett, who now teaches at Middlebury College in Vermont, presents his new Subject to Change, which “excavates the dances that exist in our dreams.” Exploring the deeper currents of a mid-career artist’s motivations and values, it’s sure to manifest the diverse interests of his wide-ranging consciousness, which investigates the sociopolitical possibilities for transformation and empathy through “lenses of choreography, philosophy, musicology, science, visual art and the supernatural.” (On Sunday at 7, the space hosts an evening of developing work, with wine and a post-show discussion, featuring dances by Alexandria Giroux, AR Movement Design, Bethany Logan, Bom Diggs, Jordyn Kahler, and Lianna E. King.)

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Music

Hamilton Leithauser

Few things evoke the early ’00s more than the Walkmen lead singer Hamilton Leithauser’s gravelly wail over distorted guitars. Leithauser’s band was a much-loved participant in the scene documented in the new book Meet Me in the Bathroom, an evaluation of the cocaine-and-leather-fueled Lower East Side indie rock of the ’00s. The band broke up in 2014, but Leithauser quickly embarked on a solo career that’s produced music more adventurous than his original project, featuring collaborations with diverse artists like Angel Olsen and Rostam Batmanglij. This week, he begins a residency at the Café Carlyle, a ritzy cabaret that couldn’t be farther from his grungy dive-bar roots.

Sophie Weiner

Music

Derrick May + Jeff Derringer + DatKat + nthng

This lineup of serious techno producers and DJs at Elsewhere combines longtime favorites with lesser-known talents. The roster leads with the heavyweights, among them the originator of techno, Detroit DJ Derrick May, alongside Jeff Derringer, a resident at Chicago’s Smart Bar and founder of the underground party Oktave, who plays crisp, big room tunes. They’re backed up by artists like the mysterious Dutch ambient techno performer nthng and Analog Soul veteran DatKat. The event will take over all of Elsewhere’s space, so make sure to wander the rooms and hear everything on offer.

Sophie Weiner

Sat

1/20

Film

Punch-Drunk Love

Photo: PHOTOFEST

A match made in PR heaven, Punch-Drunk Love brings together Hollywood’s most doggedly lowbrow young comic and its most fearlessly grandiose young director; the proponent of arrested development meets the professional enfant terrible. This avant-garde studio production is predicated on the mild disconnect of vulgarian Adam Sandler playing the “Adam Sandler character” in a concept created by the wildly ambitious Paul Thomas Anderson. What’s more, the movie is a romantic comedy. Anderson’s three previous features (Hard EightBoogie Nights, and Magnolia) are all characterized by a distinctive loser’s-lounge atmosphere. Punch-Drunk Love attempts to let some sunshine in, if barely —Anderson’s fans won’t be too surprised to learn that the mood is still a bit dark.

JHoberman

Dance

Malpaso Dance Company

The Joyce has taken this ten-member, five-year-old Cuban contemporary dance troupe, whose name means something like misstep, under its wing, which has led to the commissioning of new works by several North American choreographers. Malpaso’s winter season includes the New York premiere of Aszure Barton’s Indomitable Waltz, to music by Alexander Balanescu, Michael Nyman, and Nils Frahm, as well as Face the Torrent, a new dance by Emmy nominee Sonya Tayeh, and a 2013 piece, Ocaso, by the troupe’s artistic director and resident choreographer, Osnel Delgado.

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Dances by Very Young Choreographers

Ballet classes for kids are a dime a dozen, but finding really good training in contemporary dance — how to think, as well as how to move — for young students is a challenge. Ellen Robbins is one of the rare people who do this well, and every winter she stages programs of her charges’ choreography. This week, in addition to three concerts by her current students, she’s offering an evening of work by people who’ve studied with her, as far back as 1989, and are still working in the modern-dance field. On the bill for that Friday-night alumni show are Chanda Cragnotti, Morgana Cragnotti, Lina Dahbour, Adriane Erdos, Krista Jansen, Emma Lee, Leah Newman, Amelia Sanders, Anna Sperber, and Lucy Weisner.

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Film

Cobra Woman

The versatile German-born director Robert Siodmak only managed to squeak out four features in 1944, the slouch. Contrasted against a trio of murder mysteries and suspense stories (The Suspect, Christmas Holiday, and Phantom Lady), Cobra Woman is further distinguished by being the only one of the group to be filmed in Technicolor. And how! A favorite of latter-day necromancer-auteur Kenneth Anger, Cobra Woman, in which an enslaved people is torn between the coerced worship of a phallus (a snake god) and an orifice (an unstable volcano), is one of the last Hollywood movies in which the phony-baloney exoticism of an island nation was played for every ounce of its script’s pulp ardor, without for one moment winking to the audience to let them know it’s all stupid, but they aren’t.

Jaime NChristley

Dance

Split Bill at Triskelion

On a quiet corner in Greenpoint, this useful incubator space, which opens onto convivial courtyards, offers four troupes showing new, long-form pieces, spread over four nights with each ensemble performing twice. On opening night, Falcon Dance presents a work in progress exploring the migration patterns of birds, and shares the program with Kizuna Dance, a Japanese-inflected project directed by Cameron McKinney, premiering his new Koibito, inspired by the plight of Japanese salarymen and deploying street dance and contemporary floor work. The second bill spotlights Falcon and Jessica Reidy’s Treeline Dance Works, a performance co-op, in Lift. On Saturday, the Achievements present Vital Signs, featuring Renee Gerardo and Jenny Pommiss, and share the bill with Treeline; on Sunday Kizuna and the Achievements reprise their projects.

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Music

Jenny Scheinman’s Mischief & Mayhem

Angels and demons frolic about like old pals in Jenny Scheinman’s Mischief & Mayhem, an infectiously inventive and witty quartet led by the soulful California violinist. Long the mistress of a peculiar vein of cosmopolitan Americana, Scheinman explores more combustible environs with Wilco stunt guitarist Nels Cline, the constantly surprising drummer Jim Black, and nimble bassist Todd Sickafoose — longtime associates and frequent collaborators with deep West Coast roots of their own. Scheinman, an emotionally rich font of improvisation, channels dark folk undercurrents, hot-club jazz, and anything else floating through the room. As heard on the foursome’s eponymous 2012 release, elliptic grooves and barely restrained caterwaul duke it out in tunes like “Blues for the Double Vee,” start-stop rocker “The Mite,” and ethnomusicologically playful “Ali Farka Touché.”

Richard Gehr

Music

Royal Trux + Shilpa Ray

In a recent NPR piece, writer Steve Knopper reports that in the mid-’90s, major labels were so desperate to replicate Nirvana’s success by landing grunge bands that the young group Royal Trux were signed to Virgin Records for $1 million without the label realizing they were only a duo. This led to a mad dash to recruit new band members. For the group, it paid off: Despite their ups and downs with major-label success, Royal Trux’s raw, swaggering experimental rock music has staying power, enough so that their reunion in 2015 generated huge excitement. They play two nights at Market Hotel this week with locals Shilpa Ray and Acid Dad. Expect quite a few graying indie fans in attendance.

Sophie Weiner

Dance

Julian Barnett

NYU grad Julian Barnett, who now teaches at Middlebury College in Vermont, presents his new Subject to Change, which “excavates the dances that exist in our dreams.” Exploring the deeper currents of a mid-career artist’s motivations and values, it’s sure to manifest the diverse interests of his wide-ranging consciousness, which investigates the sociopolitical possibilities for transformation and empathy through “lenses of choreography, philosophy, musicology, science, visual art and the supernatural.” (On Sunday at 7, the space hosts an evening of developing work, with wine and a post-show discussion, featuring dances by Alexandria Giroux, AR Movement Design, Bethany Logan, Bom Diggs, Jordyn Kahler, and Lianna E. King.)

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Music

Physical Therapy + Umfang

The producer and DJ Daniel Fisher, who goes by the name Physical Therapy, is a dance-music omnivore, spitting out his own renditions of house, jungle, and pop. His eclectic DJ sets tend to reflect his desire to reach outside the obvious, and the results are captivating — and a lot of fun. He’ll play at the newly opened Nowadays indoor space with Discwoman’s Umfang, who likewise isn’t satisfied to stick within the accepted bounds of the form. With these two, you can expect the unexpected — but if you need a hint, Fisher said on his Instagram that the pair will be playing “fast techno.”

Sophie Weiner

Music

Mutual Dreaming

Three up-and-coming dance-music producers and DJs will play Ridgewood’s intimate H0L0 for Brooklyn techno prodigy Aurora Hala’s renowned Mutual Dreaming party. The event describes Berlin-based Xosar’s set as “daemonic conjuring and headbanging mysticism” with “labyrinthian percussive structures.” Meanwhile, Relaxer will delve into tense and taut techno, and Discwoman’s Shyboi will close out the lineup. Xosar describes her work as an aim to “harness the energy of emotion and convey it through music to resonate within the depths of human existence.” Let’s hope she brings us all with her.

Sophie Weiner

Sun

1/21

Dance

Malpaso Dance Company

Photo: Judy Ondrey

The Joyce has taken this ten-member, five-year-old Cuban contemporary dance troupe, whose name means something like misstep, under its wing, which has led to the commissioning of new works by several North American choreographers. Malpaso’s winter season includes the New York premiere of Aszure Barton’s Indomitable Waltz, to music by Alexander Balanescu, Michael Nyman, and Nils Frahm, as well as Face the Torrent, a new dance by Emmy nominee Sonya Tayeh, and a 2013 piece, Ocaso, by the troupe’s artistic director and resident choreographer, Osnel Delgado.

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Dances by Very Young Choreographers

Ballet classes for kids are a dime a dozen, but finding really good training in contemporary dance — how to think, as well as how to move — for young students is a challenge. Ellen Robbins is one of the rare people who do this well, and every winter she stages programs of her charges’ choreography. This week, in addition to three concerts by her current students, she’s offering an evening of work by people who’ve studied with her, as far back as 1989, and are still working in the modern-dance field. On the bill for that Friday-night alumni show are Chanda Cragnotti, Morgana Cragnotti, Lina Dahbour, Adriane Erdos, Krista Jansen, Emma Lee, Leah Newman, Amelia Sanders, Anna Sperber, and Lucy Weisner.

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Split Bill at Triskelion

On a quiet corner in Greenpoint, this useful incubator space, which opens onto convivial courtyards, offers four troupes showing new, long-form pieces, spread over four nights with each ensemble performing twice. On opening night, Falcon Dance presents a work in progress exploring the migration patterns of birds, and shares the program with Kizuna Dance, a Japanese-inflected project directed by Cameron McKinney, premiering his new Koibito, inspired by the plight of Japanese salarymen and deploying street dance and contemporary floor work. The second bill spotlights Falcon and Jessica Reidy’s Treeline Dance Works, a performance co-op, in Lift. On Saturday, the Achievements present Vital Signs, featuring Renee Gerardo and Jenny Pommiss, and share the bill with Treeline; on Sunday Kizuna and the Achievements reprise their projects.

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Mon

1/22

Film

Fashion in Film

Photo: Zoolander (2001) / Courtesy Paramount

The fashion industry, simultaneously glamorous and cutthroat, naturally lends itself to onscreen intrigue: There’s a distinct pleasure to be had in watching characters wear opulent costumes we wouldn’t dare try on ourselves in real life. Phantom Thread, Paul Thomas Anderson’s emotionally prickly tale of a mid-century London couturier, has emerged as the most recent arrival in the cinema’s pantheon of fashion-world allure. With the movie now playing at Brooklyn’s Alamo Drafthouse in glorious 70mm, staff programmer Cristina Cacioppo has assembled a characteristically playful companion lineup of nine other films that also represent the vast potential of fabulous outfits to captivate audiences. (The series began earlier this month and continues through the end of January.)

Abbey Bender

 

Tue

1/23

Dance

New York City Ballet

The children are nestled all snug in their wee little beds, and the mice and snowflakes have been shelved for another season, but life at New York City Ballet goes on despite upheaval at the top, this winter celebrating the centennial of choreographer Jerome Robbins, along with dance odyssey, a new dance by corps de ballet member Peter Walker, and Alexei Ratmansky’s Russian Seasons. Opening week toggles between Balanchine favorites and new dances by Troy Schumacher, Gianna Reisen, Angelin Preljocaj, and Justin Peck. Coming in time for Valentine’s Day are two weeks of Peter Martins’s stark, Scandinavian Romeo and Juliet. Saturday, the company founder’s birthday, packs in two all-Balanchine programs.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Performance

Dean Moss

The world premiere of Dean Moss’s greatly anticipated seventy-minute Petra, described as a “masochistic autobiographical meditation on desire,” and inspired by Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s film The Bitter Tears of Petra von Kant, features a cast of female immigrants well known in the downtown dance community, including Mina Nishimura, Sari Nordman, Kaneza Schaal, Samita Sinha, and Paz Tanjuaquio. Collaborating on video are Julia Cumming, Cassie Mey, Marya Warshaw, and Asher Woodworth; ten other artists contribute to the production, one of the last in this year’s Coil festival at the newly reopened and renamed Performance Space New York.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Kader Attou–Company Accrorap

This French-Algerian troupe of eleven male hip-hop dancers makes its U.S. debut with The Roots. Directed and choreographed by “dance smuggler” Kader Attou, it combines hip-hop with circus, contemporary dance, and graphic arts. Blending his own Mediterranean culture with the French accents of the Centre Chorégraphic National in La Rochelle, which he’s been directing for the past ten years, Attou takes New York–born hip-hop and blends it with a host of other influences to create this new piece, which has an original sound score by Régis Ballet and Diaphane. Meet the director and the dancers at a post-curtain chat on Wednesday evening.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Wed

1/24

Performance

Dean Moss

The world premiere of Dean Moss’s greatly anticipated seventy-minute Petra, described as a “masochistic autobiographical meditation on desire,” and inspired by Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s film The Bitter Tears of Petra von Kant, features a cast of female immigrants well known in the downtown dance community, including Mina Nishimura, Sari Nordman, Kaneza Schaal, Samita Sinha, and Paz Tanjuaquio. Collaborating on video are Julia Cumming, Cassie Mey, Marya Warshaw, and Asher Woodworth; ten other artists contribute to the production, one of the last in this year’s Coil festival at the newly reopened and renamed Performance Space New York.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Kader Attou–Company Accrorap

This French-Algerian troupe of eleven male hip-hop dancers makes its U.S. debut with The Roots. Directed and choreographed by “dance smuggler” Kader Attou, it combines hip-hop with circus, contemporary dance, and graphic arts. Blending his own Mediterranean culture with the French accents of the Centre Chorégraphic National in La Rochelle, which he’s been directing for the past ten years, Attou takes New York–born hip-hop and blends it with a host of other influences to create this new piece, which has an original sound score by Régis Ballet and Diaphane. Meet the director and the dancers at a post-curtain chat on Wednesday evening.

Elizabeth Zimmer