Sun

6/17

Mon

6/18

Tue

6/19

Wed

6/20

Thu

6/21

Fri

6/22

Sat

6/23

Today

Sun

6/17

Film

The Damned

Photo: Courtesy of Cineteca di Bologna and Institut Lumiere (Lyon)

In 1969’s The Damned, the heady, twisted decadence with which Luchino Visconti films the lives of a family of German industrialists during World War II is an effort to reimagine the world that bred (and was bred by) Nazism. The behavior in the film is monstrous, with just about every imaginable sin depicted — murder, molestation, incest — and the picture fit perhaps too easily into the late-Sixties/early-Seventies fashion of Nazisploitation films. But Visconti wants to plunge us into the textures and postures of this world, however gruesome they may be, so as to help us better understand how it came to be.

—Bilge Ebiri

Pride

1 Bronx Pride Festival

The 1 Bronx Pride Festival kicks off with a march down 161st Street to 149th Street and Third Avenue — after Times Square, maybe the city’s busiest intersection. This year’s hosts include Dominique Jackson and Ryan Jamaal Swain from Pose, the hit FX series that celebrates the Eighties ball scene. Steve Canals, the show’s Bronx-born co-creator, calls it “a love letter…to the miraculous queer and trans, black and brown souls who managed to create community in the face of a plague, violence, and familial rejection.” 1 Bronx Pride’s tagline sends much the same message: Resist. Be heard. Be Valiant. Indeed. 

—Coco McPherson

Dance

Hawaiian Performances and Demonstrations

Twenty paintings by Georgia O’Keefe are only some of what pours from the cornucopia of Hawaiian riches on offer this summer in the stunning environs of the Bronx’s Botanical Garden. Both traditional and contemporary hula performances, with live music, take place Saturday and Sunday afternoons, offered by Pua Ali’i ‘Ilima o Nuioka, Pomaikai Klein (June 17), and five other groups. Want to learn this tempting form yourself? On Saturday nights, interactive hula lessons are held on the Conservatory Lawn, along with displays by other visual artists and refreshments (a poke bowl, anyone?) for sale.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Film

The Leopard

There are many historical films, but Luchino Visconti’s The Leopard (1963) is, to my mind, one of the rare movies that is genuinely about history. That is to say, it depicts, through its drama, its character interactions, and its visual style, an actual historical process, in all its messiness, contradiction, and ridiculousness: the replacement of one class by another, the consolidation of a scattered land of fiefdoms and nation-states into one country. Even the most intimate scenes seethe with a sense of change, of a society transforming before our very eyes.

—Bilge Ebiri

Film

Filming Othello

There’s a lot to be said about the nature and origins of Orson Welles’s 1952 movie adaptation of Shakespeare’s tragedy, and a great deal of it is spoken aloud, eloquently, by Welles himself, in this 1978 making-of feature, arguably the greatest DVD extra ever to predate the era of home video. But Filming Othello both is and is not an appendage to its subject; Welles’s parallel humility and thoroughness confounds we ordinary spectators. Filming Othello treads lightly on casting about blame for the tortuous fate that pursued his movie long after its 1952 Cannes premiere. Circumspectly but forcefully, he conveys what he’d become, a legend, a tower, seasoned by a lifetime of disappointments, shored up by injured pride. It’s now more or less a consensus view that Othello is a great movie; Filming Othello can be regarded as a great essay, a crucial expansion of our understanding of Welles’s inestimable legacy.

—Jaime N. Christley

Film

The Long Riders

By today’s lights, the “revisionist western” ought to impress exactly nobody, but age has improved Walter Hill’s entries into the genre considerably. Stringently free of undue sentiment, Hill’s 1980 super-western (in which four sets of real-life brothers play principal roles in the saga of the James gang’s midwestern lawlessness) both follows in the footsteps of the baroque Peckinpah and sets the stage for the rigorous Michael Mann. With his fast cutting and devotion to sensory overload (he was the man who made 48 Hrs., after all), Hill has been relegated by some skeptics to the steerage class of shallow Eighties carnival barkers. But no one of the latter day, save Eastwood, has grappled more intelligently with western tropes, fixed largely on the mundane concerns of a given moment or impasse, rather than attempting to lend all fleeting minutia the dimensions of winking eternity. Have fun with this one, and savor its melancholy aftertaste.

—Jaime N. Christley

TV

Claws

Summer’s on the horizon, which makes now an excellent time to hop aboard the good ship Claws — a splashy TNT crime drama set in and around a nail salon in Manatee County, Florida. Claws, which launched its second season on June 10, is a tall, sweaty glass of spiked lemonade, a sweet-tart treat that masks its depth with sugary, guilty-pleasure trimmings. It suggests, in big, bold, sequin-encrusted strokes, that the American dream itself may just be a con job; that nobody really bootstraps their way to success.

—Lara Zarum

Mon

6/18

Music

Paal Nilssen-Love Large Unit + Anteloper

Photo: Paal Nilssen-Love / Peter Gannushkin

Some big bands are smoothly tuned vehicles for a series of politely delivered solos. The Paal Nilssen-Love Large Unit, on the other hand, offers the sort of vehicle in which a soloist may choose his or her accompanists in the middle of a piece like “Happy Slappy.” The Norwegian drummer and composer Paal Nilssen has immaculate free-jazz credentials alongside players like saxophonists Mats Gustafsson (of the Thing) and Ken Vandermark. He’s led his steamrolling big band, which usually involves around a dozen players, since 2013. Their music oscillates between ferocity and intimacy; offers opportunities for solos, duos, and other breakouts; features freaky guitar and electronics expressions; and glories in brawny, parading ensemble interludes. Opener Anteloper consists of trumpeter Jaimie Branch and drummer Jason Nazary, who explore their own electroacoustic terrain on a smaller but still emotionally satisfying scale.

—Richard Gehr

Music

Ed Palermo Big Band

Best known for its longtime devotion to the humorous, tuneful, and often technically challenging gratifications of Frank Zappa’s music, the Ed Palermo Big Band has been branching out into other evergreen sources of boomer sustenance. On last spring’s The Great Un-American Songbook: Volumes I & II, Palermo’s solid eighteen-piece crew dusted off the heady delights of British psychedelic rock with inventive new arrangements of FM-radio staples by Traffic, King Crimson, Jethro Tull, and Radiohead. Later in the year, Palermo released The Adventures of Zod Zundgren, a benign confluence of Todd Rundgren’s and Zappa’s brainy pop performed with power and precision. Here Palermo — a saxophonist, conductor, and composer in his own right — belatedly celebrates the Summer of Love’s fiftieth anniversary with a set that should lean heavy on all things psychedelic and Sixties. Expect blink-and-you’ll-miss-’em references aplenty, perhaps integrated into an evening-long conceptual continuity.

—Richard Gehr

Tue

6/19

Film

Quatermass and the Pit

Photo: photofest

Science-fiction enthusiasts of the Fifties and Sixties were familiar with the character of Professor Bernard Quatermass, a creation of the English screenwriter Nigel Kneale; Kneale’s story, Quatermass and the Pit, was performed in a live BBC telecast in the late Fifties. In it, a massive object buried deep beneath the London Underground is gradually revealed to be a hostile spacecraft of unknown origins and indecipherable abilities. In this large-scale, 1967 Hammer production, what begins as a quaint, H.G. Wells–infused mystery where people say things like “Now look here” without a glint of irony is transformed — after a series of slow turns — into full-throated apocalyptic horror. Capable and imaginative director Roy Ward Baker (A Night to Remember) conveys a London that’s about to sink into an abyss, or tear itself to pieces, while preserving an edifice of the inscrutable. The result is an array of disquieting images that will burn into the memory.

Jaime NChristley

Pride

Family Movie Night: Beauty and the Beast

Families looking to celebrate Pride Week together need look no further than the outdoor Family Movie Night, which this year is screening Disney’s Beauty and the Beast, at Hudson River Park’s Pier 45. Miss Richfield 1981, the drag alter-ego of Minnesota’s Russ King, will be making a repeat appearance as host. While the event is free, movie passes, which offer reserved seating (and goodie bags!), are also available for a fee; all proceeds will go to Heritage of Pride / NYC Pride and other LGBTQ organizations.

Nina Pearlman

TV

Drunk History

The sixth season of this little web series that could premieres Tuesday on Comedy Central; this season’s sloshed storytellers include 30 Rock’s John Lutz and Fresh Off the Boat’s Randall Park. Look out for appearances by Seth Rogen, Jack Black, and Vanessa Hudgens.

Village Voice staff

Wed

6/20

TV

Yellowstone

Photo: Paramount

Kevin Costner is back, bb! Started at Waterworld, now we at…Yellowstone?! Anyway! This show just sounds so…Kevin Costner. He’s a rancher fighting for his land and way of life in a modern-day epic that will surely be very intense and very male. And check out this cast: Cole Hauser, Wes Bentley, Kelly Reilly, Luke Grimes, Dave Annable, Danny Huston, Gil Birmingham, Josh Lucas, Gretchen Mol, and Jill Hennessy. Again, it’s just so Kevin Costner, and if you’re into what he’s selling, then this will be the perfect show for you and your dad to watch together.

Laura Beck

Pride

Big Gay Roller Skate

LeFrak Center, the skating rink on the east side of Prospect Park, will host a come-one-come-all roller-skating bash featuring hours of music and drag performances on skates. If that doesn’t sound impressive to you, or if you’re too scared to step out on the rink, get boozed up at the pre-skate cocktail hour (skating starts at 7 p.m.) and then give it a try. Skates will be available for rental.

—Jake Bittle

Music

Grizzly Bear & Spoon With Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith

I caught Grizzly Bear back in 2010, when they were making indie-rock waves with their album Veckatimest, from the previous year. At that time, I remember listening to the band with mere passing interest, my ears only really perking up when the group finally played its ubiquitous-at-the-time single “Two Weeks.” But in the intervening years, their music — complex, intricate, and emotionally intense — has quietly grown on me, and the band itself has become one of my favorites. The bandshell’s open-air setting should prove the perfect venue in which to let Grizzly Bear’s interwoven melodies waft over you. I know they’ll be getting my full attention this time around.

Nina Pearlman

Film

Charm City

Between Theo Anthony’s Rat Film (2016) and Marilyn Ness’s Charm City, Baltimore has emerged as a fertile subject for documentarians. Although conventional (talking-head interviews and contextual title cards pepper the film), Ness’s latest effectively charts the impact of violence on poor black neighborhoods within the city over the course of three years, from early 2015 to late 2017. A few principle players anchor the doc: city councilman Brandon Scott; Clayton “Mr. C” Guyton, a local leader and founder of a community center, seen conducting impromptu curbside meetings; and Alex Long, a youth coordinator and a kind of apprentice to Mr. C, who’s helping to keep his street free of gangs and drug dealers. It all adds up to an even-handed issue film featuring those who are working to change the face of one of the U.S.’s most violent cities.

—Tanner Tafelski

Thu

6/21

Music

Aimee Mann + Superchunk + Jonathan Coulton

Photo: Aimee Mann / Membran

I am ashamed to say I’ve never seen Aimee Mann live, since she’s performed so many iterations of offbeat indie singer-songwriteriness that you’d think we’d have crossed paths in RL by now. (Personal off-the-offbeat favorite: Her rendition of Paul McCartney’s “Too Many People” on a RAM covers album that WFMU released a few years back, which performed the impressive trick of making Sir Paul’s version seem comparatively unschooled in art-pop perfection.) Getting to see her on a bill with Superchunk is a must-see, as their new album, What a Time to Be Alive, is a masterpiece of punk anti-Trump rage, and they’re one of indie rock’s most unbeatable live bands to boot.

—Neil deMause

Comedy

The Exposed Bone Workshop

Yes, the title is a mouthful. But Charles O’Leary’s fleet, funny satire The Exposed Bone Workshop Collective Ensemble Studio “Not Just Your Average Theatre Company” Theatre Company Presents: “When Pigs Fly!” A Reading Series of Hot & Spicy New American Plays Written by the Artistic Director adeptly thumbs the now even if that now has become then by the time you’ve read through the play’s name. Presented as a season of staged readings of new plays by a troubled theater company’s vainglorious doof of an a.d., The Exposed Bone uproariously lampoons that most lampoonable of figures: the straight white dude writer (Max Reinhardsen) who just can’t comprehend anyone else’s experience — or how the world has changed. A diverse cast at first embodies and then contests his clueless new dramas and musicals, with Natalie Rich quite literally stopping the show with a for-the-ages (and of-the-moment) expression of deadpan disgust. Afterwards, you’ll likely be humming the inspirational song, crooned by Diane Chen, about how nice it would be to get out of acting and work at HowlRound.

Alan Scherstuhl

Music

Descartes a Kant

CSI: Marriage would have made an apt alternate title for Mexican romance terrorists Descartes a Kant’s recent third album, Victims of Love Propaganda. Fronted by Sandrushka Petrova, who formed the group in Guadalajara in 2001, and Dafne Carballo, the sextet perform exacting, complex, and raucous post-punk music with the genre-capering compulsiveness of combos like Naked City, Mr. Bungle, and the Mothers of Invention. Songs about birthdays, weddings, divorces, therapy, self-image, depression, and self-aware feminist vitriol are delivered with costumed and choreographed precision. Petrova and Carballo’s guitars snarl with echoes of Sonic Youth and Annie Clark, and producer Steve Albini makes Victims sound immediate and vital from opening track (“You Assfucked My Heart”) to the fatalistic closing stanza: “We’ll care until we won’t/I’ll love you until I don’t.”

—Richard Gehr

Fri

6/22

Comedy

The Exposed Bone Workshop

Photo: Crystal Arnette

Yes, the title is a mouthful. But Charles O’Leary’s fleet, funny satire The Exposed Bone Workshop Collective Ensemble Studio “Not Just Your Average Theatre Company” Theatre Company Presents: “When Pigs Fly!” A Reading Series of Hot & Spicy New American Plays Written by the Artistic Director adeptly thumbs the now even if that now has become then by the time you’ve read through the play’s name. Presented as a season of staged readings of new plays by a troubled theater company’s vainglorious doof of an a.d., The Exposed Bone uproariously lampoons that most lampoonable of figures: the straight white dude writer (Max Reinhardsen) who just can’t comprehend anyone else’s experience — or how the world has changed. A diverse cast at first embodies and then contests his clueless new dramas and musicals, with Natalie Rich quite literally stopping the show with a for-the-ages (and of-the-moment) expression of deadpan disgust. Afterwards, you’ll likely be humming the inspirational song, crooned by Diane Chen, about how nice it would be to get out of acting and work at HowlRound.

Alan Scherstuhl

Film

The Departure

“The goal is for you to experience ‘departure,’ ” Rinzai Zen monk Ittetsu Nemoto tells the visitors to his temple in rural Japan early in The Departure. “Today, we’re holding this retreat for you to find out what it means to die.” Lana Wilson’s follow-up to the deeply empathetic documentary After Tiller (a survey of the work and patients of the few American doctors left performing late-term abortions, co-directed with Martha Shane) is another intimate, clear-eyed study of people facing the hardest of choices — in this case, the decision to continue to live.

Alan Scherstuhl

Sat

6/23

Art

Maren Hassinger: Monuments

Photo: Maren Hassinger, “Study for Monuments,” 2018 (detail) / COURTESY THE ARTIST

Starting in June, the Studio Museum in Harlem presents “Maren Hassinger: Monuments,” which includes eight new sculptures, in Marcus Garvey Park, by the artist, who has a long association with the museum (she was an artist-in-residence in 1984). Similar to some of her previous works, the new sculptures will be made from tree branches that Hassinger found around the city, and which will be fashioned into objects, with help from New York high school students, just prior to when the exhibit opens. This sort of civic engagement has long been on the artist’s mind. In 2015, during a retrospective of her work in Atlanta, she said she wanted to get back to the ideals of the civil rights movement, and “to concentrate on issues and environments where we all have a common interest.” What better place to do that than in a New York City public park?

—Pac Pobric

Film

En el Séptimo Día

Jim McKay‘s En el Séptimo Día concerns José (Fernando Cardona), the star player on a nine-a-side team of mostly undocumented workers from Puebla, Mexico. José is grasping at a sporting glory rather more muted than what will be on display at the World Cup, but which is, nevertheless, a profound source of pleasure, achievement, and grace — the high point of a week otherwise spent biking across Brooklyn, delivering paper-in-plastic takeout bags filled with upscale Mexican food. But, suddenly, a dilemma: The league’s championship game is approaching the following Sunday, José’s usual day of rest, and his boss is demanding everyone show up for an important private party. Over the weekend-to-weekend timeline of the film, José weighs his responsibilities at work and to his friends and teammates.

—Mark Asch

Comedy

The Exposed Bone Workshop

Yes, the title is a mouthful. But Charles O’Leary’s fleet, funny satire The Exposed Bone Workshop Collective Ensemble Studio “Not Just Your Average Theatre Company” Theatre Company Presents: “When Pigs Fly!” A Reading Series of Hot & Spicy New American Plays Written by the Artistic Director adeptly thumbs the now even if that now has become then by the time you’ve read through the play’s name. Presented as a season of staged readings of new plays by a troubled theater company’s vainglorious doof of an a.d., The Exposed Bone uproariously lampoons that most lampoonable of figures: the straight white dude writer (Max Reinhardsen) who just can’t comprehend anyone else’s experience — or how the world has changed. A diverse cast at first embodies and then contests his clueless new dramas and musicals, with Natalie Rich quite literally stopping the show with a for-the-ages (and of-the-moment) expression of deadpan disgust. Afterwards, you’ll likely be humming the inspirational song, crooned by Diane Chen, about how nice it would be to get out of acting and work at HowlRound.

Alan Scherstuhl