Sun

7/15

Mon

7/16

Tue

7/17

Wed

7/18

Thu

7/19

Fri

7/20

Sat

7/21

Today

Sun

7/15

Film

McCabe and Mrs. Miller

Photo: Photofest

Robert Altman’s languid western McCabe and Mrs. Miller (1971) forsakes the gunfire and action theatrics typical of the genre in favor of somber grappling with the economics of the American Dream. Altman understood that constructing the West meant building it from the ground up, and with that came the mundane problems of the everyday. McCabe and Mrs. Miller finds its poetry in the quotidian images of Altman and the late cinematographer Vilmos Zsigmond; shot with snowy, stately elegance and loaded with unspeakably beautiful images, the town that John McCabe (Warren Beatty) and others are constructing appears at once organic and otherworldly. It feels like it is being raised, heroically, up from the earth itself, and the workers expect their fair share and a chance to thrive for their hard labor. They achieve these things for some time, but, as in most every story about capitalism, there’s always a bigger predator waiting and willing to swallow up anything meeker in hopes of more power and capital. Altman’s West looks at the smaller man and how he tries to survive in spite of this harsh knowledge.

Willow Maclay

Music

Just Alap Raga Ensemble

La Monte Young, the 82-year-old link between India’s Hindustani classical music tradition and the American minimalist composition mode he pioneered, concludes a short run of increasingly rare concerts with his Just Alap Raga Ensemble Sunday afternoon. Under the tutelage of Indian vocalist Pandit Pran Nath, whom these concerts memorialize, Young explored a world of extended, meterless tones that would deeply inspire his own works. Here he conducts and harmonizes with fellow singers Marian Zazeela, his wife and longtime collaborator, and Jung Hee Choi, the couple’s disciple in music and lighting design, accompanied by Naren Budhkar on tabla. The group will perform a Pran Nath composition that is based on a Krishna love story and set musically in Raga Vrindabani Sarang. The style is leisurely, to say the least, but the atmosphere, overtones, and magenta lighting effects are transcendent.

Richard Gehr

Dance

Batsheva — The Young Ensemble

Straight from a run at the Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival in Massachusetts comes Batsheva — The Young Ensemble, the junior offshoot of Tel Aviv’s leading troupe Batsheva. The outfit brings with them Naharin’s Virus, a Bessie Award–winning piece by Ohad Naharin, who recently announced that he’s stepping down as the company’s director but will continue to choreograph. Adapted from Peter Handke’s play Offending the Audience, the deeply ambiguous work, which had its U.S. premiere in 2002, includes sections of Handke’s text, a huge blackboard at the back of the stage, and other deeply theatrical strategies.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Performance

Boylesque Bullfight

For ten years, Austin McCormick’s peripatetic baroque-burlesque ensemble Company XIV has mounted stunning, raunchy versions of popular fairy tales and Petipa ballets. This summer, it offers an ingenious original piece, Boylesque Bullfight, in its own Brooklyn cabaret space. Eight shapely men, attired in little more than jeweled codpieces, corsets, and horned helmets, bring us a jaw-dropping version of Munro Leaf’s 1936 nursery story of Ferdinand, the bull who never learned to fight. The action comes ornamented with soprano Marcy Richardson singing arias from Bizet’s Carmen and a delightful playlist including Tom Waits, Yma Sumac, Gloria Gaynor, and tango tunes. A man-size honeybee rocks point shoes; the very talented performers work out on poles, spiral in Spanish dance styles with lace mantillas and fans, and climax, under a rain of glitter, in a kick-line wearing fake breasts. A blast for all is just about guaranteed.

Elizabeth Zimmer

TV

Sharp Objects

Marti Noxon is back at it again with her shows about fed up women and I’m back at it again with LOVING EVERY MINUTE OF IT. This one is based on a book by Gillian Flynn, stars Amy Adams, and is directed by Big Little Lies’ Jean-Marc Vallée. All that tells me is that it’s gonna have hell of twists and turns and in the end, you’re gonna be cheering when Amy Adams FUCKS SOME MAN UP. Yes, girl!! Get it! I signed up for some kickboxing classes to take right after every episode so I can channel my rage into cardio. I will pretend the punching bag is Jeff Sessions’s dumpy ol’ face and I will ravage it.

Laura Beck

TV

Who Is America?

Showtime snuck this new series from Sacha Baron Cohen into the lineup at the last minute. Apparently, the undercover comic has been filming the show for the past year, and on Sunday, we’ll be able to judge if his brand of gotcha humor is relevant in our post-shame world.

Village Voice staff

Mon

7/16

Film

Morvern Callar

Photo: Photofest

The lead in Lynne Ramsay’s second feature, Morvern Callar (2002), does everything in her power to flee from death after discovering her boyfriend’s corpse one Christmas morning. A grocery-store employee pinned under the wheels of economic futility, Morvern (Samantha Morton) is left alone without an escape route. She never takes the time to fully reckon with the loss of her lover; instead, she overdoses on life. She takes a trip to Spain, has sex with strange men, gets lost in the desert. In Ramsay’s close-ups on Morton’s face, you can see a woman who’s breaking under the pressure, overloading her life with potent but fleeting experiences. Morton subtly conveys the deep loss that suicide leaves behind, while also tapping into a sense of reckless abandon. Ramsay amplifies the performance with an understanding of image and aural effect; the movie at times feels like the unleashing of a torrent of despair that can only be drowned out by the blaring of pop music in cheap headphones.

Willow Maclay

Film

Such Good Friends

Around the time when Otto Preminger played Mr. Freeze on Batman and dropped acid to make Skidoo, the imperious auteur had amassed some currency as a know-something celeb, a regular guest on chichi chat shows. It’s this LBJ-era, cosmopolitan incarnation of the Preminger persona that’s most relevant to Such Good Friends, a seriocomic look at the Manhattan infidelity scene — a world of little black books, overpriced cocktails, and lecherous concierges. Contrasted with the cartoonish Skidoo, this 1971 movie, grounded by the dry (and pseudonymous) wit of screenwriter Elaine May, is a return to the form Preminger profited most by: his coolly distanced empathy, illustrating a wealth of precise, oddball human detail with a paintbrush ten feet long. It’s a little messy, a little too burdened by the need to be with-it, but it’s so close to a win as to be a glorious loss. James Coco, unsung hero of husky character actors, contributes a brilliant turn as Dyan Cannon’s devilish friend Timmy.

Jaime NChristley

Tue

7/17

Film

The Leopard

Photo: courtesy of Cineteca di Bologna, Pathé, Fondation Jérôme Seydoux-Pathé, Twentieth Century Fox, and CSC-Cineteca Nazionale

There are many historical films, but Luchino Visconti’s The Leopard (1963) is, to my mind, one of the rare movies that is genuinely about history. That is to say, it depicts, through its drama, its character interactions, and its visual style, an actual historical process, in all its messiness, contradiction, and ridiculousness: the replacement of one class by another, the consolidation of a scattered land of fiefdoms and nation-states into one country. Even the most intimate scenes seethe with a sense of change, of a society transforming before our very eyes.

—Bilge Ebiri

Dance

Batsheva — The Young Ensemble

Straight from a run at the Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival in Massachusetts comes Batsheva — The Young Ensemble, the junior offshoot of Tel Aviv’s leading troupe Batsheva. The outfit brings with them Naharin’s Virus, a Bessie Award–winning piece by Ohad Naharin, who recently announced that he’s stepping down as the company’s director but will continue to choreograph. Adapted from Peter Handke’s play Offending the Audience, the deeply ambiguous work, which had its U.S. premiere in 2002, includes sections of Handke’s text, a huge blackboard at the back of the stage, and other deeply theatrical strategies.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Film

L’Assassino

Alfredo Martelli (Marcello Mastroianni), a badly overleveraged antiques dealer, is hauled in by Rome homicide detectives when one of his creditors, an older woman (played in flashbacks by Micheline Presle) who had him on a short leash, turns up dead. Director Elio Petri, making his debut, dilutes any procedural juice to the nth degree, as if to conceal his strategy behind the frosted glass of nonchalant straight drama. It’s also part comedy, a wry variation on Hitchcock’s The Wrong Man: Instead of asking how close a sound legal system can push an innocent man to a trumped-up felony conviction, Petri’s 1961 film ponders how much of a schmuck one guy can be without disturbing your uncertainty as to whether or not he actually did the murder. As Mastroianni’s subtly modulated performance radiates mealymouthed, phony bravado, guilt sticks to Martelli like the smell of garbage. It’s possible he dunnit, but everything around him — the flatfoots who grill him, his busybody neighbors, his train wreck of a life — is so slovenly, you can’t be sure of anything.

Jaime NChristley

 

Wed

7/18

Art

Radical Women: Latin American Art, 1960–1985

Photo: Marie Orensanz, "Limitada" (detail) / COURTESY ALEJANDRA VON HARTZ GALLERY / © MARIE ORENSANZ

The opening of “Radical Women: Latin American Art, 1960–1985” at the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles last September was a revelation: finally, a thoughtful, scholarly exhibition with real popular appeal that focused on a period of cultural history that was almost completely unrecorded in conservative, mainstream surveys. Just up at the Brooklyn Museum — its only East Coast venue — the show includes more than 260 works by more than 120 artists from 15 countries that underwent tremendous political upheaval in the mid-twentieth century. Those contexts — of American military interventions; dictatorships in Brazil, Chile, and elsewhere; and the rise of Black Power movements around the world — inspired artists like Anna Maria Maiolino and Victoria Santa Cruz, two of the most compelling creators in the show, to radicalize modern art to political ends. During our own moment of political turmoil, this is a timely and important exhibition.

Pac Pobric

Music

Brave Combo

Carl Finch’s Texas quintet, Brave Combo, continues its longtime musical mission to squinch together myriad vernacular styles into a giant, multicolored Play-Doh ball of polka-scented fun. Founded in 1979, the accordionist’s combo draws upon an encyclopedic and irrepressibly perky repertoire of border styles and rootless cosmopolitanisms, from cumbia, merengue, and norteño to klezmer, polka, and hard-core hokey-pokey. They’ve played David Byrne’s wedding reception, served as Oktoberfest entertainment on The Simpsons (“Fill the Stein”), and recorded “Hey Jude” with Tiny Tim. Their music has become increasingly unpredictable over the decades, with art-rock ditties like “The Best Sunsets Are in the West” and punky accordion rave-ups like “Hop to It” adding salsa to their repertoire. This gig features a rare reappearance by fan-favorite former members Bubba Hernandez and Jeffrey Barnes.

Richard Gehr

Dance

Batsheva — The Young Ensemble

Straight from a run at the Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival in Massachusetts comes Batsheva — The Young Ensemble, the junior offshoot of Tel Aviv’s leading troupe Batsheva. The outfit brings with them Naharin’s Virus, a Bessie Award–winning piece by Ohad Naharin, who recently announced that he’s stepping down as the company’s director but will continue to choreograph. Adapted from Peter Handke’s play Offending the Audience, the deeply ambiguous work, which had its U.S. premiere in 2002, includes sections of Handke’s text, a huge blackboard at the back of the stage, and other deeply theatrical strategies.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Thu

7/19

Music

Jupiter & Okwess

Photo: Florent De La Tullaye

The feverish highlight of last winter’s Globalfest, Jupiter & Okwess brought fresh, brash regional rhythms from the Democratic Republic of Congo to blustery Times Square. Laughing, growling Jupiter Bokondji fronts the group, which he took over in the early Eighties. (Okwess means “food” in the Kibunda tongue.) Drums, bass, and electric guitars provide galloping beats and stuttering funk-rock architectonics on the group’s recent album, Kin Sonic, on which Bokondji condemns corruption, poverty, kleptocracy, and inequality in the Lingala, Mongo, Tetela, and Tshiluba languages. Bokondji was born in the Sixties and has processed his country’s various stages throughout the decades. In that light, “Nzele Momi” demands respect and security for women to an increasingly urgent four-on-the-floor beat, while “Benanga” mocks monarchs and all other forces of exploitation.

Richard Gehr

Film

The Leopard

There are many historical films, but Luchino Visconti’s The Leopard (1963) is, to my mind, one of the rare movies that is genuinely about history. That is to say, it depicts, through its drama, its character interactions, and its visual style, an actual historical process, in all its messiness, contradiction, and ridiculousness: the replacement of one class by another, the consolidation of a scattered land of fiefdoms and nation-states into one country. Even the most intimate scenes seethe with a sense of change, of a society transforming before our very eyes.

—Bilge Ebiri

Film

The Damned

In 1969’s The Damned, the heady, twisted decadence with which Luchino Visconti films the lives of a family of German industrialists during World War II is an effort to reimagine the world that bred (and was bred by) Nazism. The behavior in the film is monstrous, with just about every imaginable sin depicted — murder, molestation, incest — and the picture fit perhaps too easily into the late-Sixties/early-Seventies fashion of Nazisploitation films. But Visconti wants to plunge us into the textures and postures of this world, however gruesome they may be, so as to help us better understand how it came to be.

—Bilge Ebiri

Film

Get Out

Jordan Peele’s Get Out is the most trenchant studio release in years, a slow-building, often hilarious horror thriller built upon a dead-serious idea: that a black man walking alone through white suburbs is in as much danger as any slasher-flick teenager. Peele opens with that image, showing us, in a long and tense single take, a young man making his way down a sidewalk at night, studying the interchangeable homes for an address. A car eases up behind him, moving too slow, and the revelation — a sick joke you might choke on as you laugh — is that Get Out needs none of the phantasmagoric trappings of its genre to terrify. What’s the usual restless spirit or chainsaw maniac got on a paranoid white dude with a concealed carry?

Alan Scherstuhl

Dance

Batsheva — The Young Ensemble

Straight from a run at the Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival in Massachusetts comes Batsheva — The Young Ensemble, the junior offshoot of Tel Aviv’s leading troupe Batsheva. The outfit brings with them Naharin’s Virus, a Bessie Award–winning piece by Ohad Naharin, who recently announced that he’s stepping down as the company’s director but will continue to choreograph. Adapted from Peter Handke’s play Offending the Audience, the deeply ambiguous work, which had its U.S. premiere in 2002, includes sections of Handke’s text, a huge blackboard at the back of the stage, and other deeply theatrical strategies.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Fri

7/20

TV

In Search Of

Photo: Courtesy History Channel

OH HELL YES ZACHARY QUINTO BACK ON THE AIRWAVES. The fionest man in all of TV is back to ignite our loins and perplex our brains as he revives this investigative series from the 1970s. Fun fact: Leonard Nimoy (a/k/a Spock) (a/k/a excellent photographer of awesome fat women) hosted the original, and now Zachary (also a/k/a Spock) is taking over the reins. They’re just two wonderful men gracing our TVs and bringing us all sorts of shock and awe and good vibes. Maybe the world isn’t total garbage after all!! (Sike: It is! But these two dudes are A-OK!)

Laura Beck

Film

Dance on Camera Festival

A co-production of the Film Society of Lincoln Center and the Dance Films Association, this year’s festival — its namesake’s 46th — offers sixteen programs encompassing ambitious features and quirky shorts from seventeen countries. In addition to the programs at the giant Walter Reade Theater, free screenings and discussions take place in the FSLC’s Elinor Bunin Monroe Film Center Amphitheater across the street. Grab an all-access pass, another discount package, or single tickets and enjoy the comfy, commercial-free cinema environs.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Contemporary Dance Series

On Fridays at 6 p.m. this summer, Tiffany Rea-Fisher curates free outdoor concerts, with multiple dance companies performing nightly on an elevated stage. So far, the series — which has been running since June 22 — has hosted appearances by Graham2, the AThomasProject, Mindy Jackson, NOW Dance Project, the Peridance Contemporary Dance Company, and more. It all leads up to the concluding program, on July 20, of HopeBoykinDance, Julia Ehrstrand, Gabrielle Lamb, and Earl Mosley’s Institute of the Arts.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Batsheva — The Young Ensemble

Straight from a run at the Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival in Massachusetts comes Batsheva — The Young Ensemble, the junior offshoot of Tel Aviv’s leading troupe Batsheva. The outfit brings with them Naharin’s Virus, a Bessie Award–winning piece by Ohad Naharin, who recently announced that he’s stepping down as the company’s director but will continue to choreograph. Adapted from Peter Handke’s play Offending the Audience, the deeply ambiguous work, which had its U.S. premiere in 2002, includes sections of Handke’s text, a huge blackboard at the back of the stage, and other deeply theatrical strategies.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Performance

Boylesque Bullfight

For ten years, Austin McCormick’s peripatetic baroque-burlesque ensemble Company XIV has mounted stunning, raunchy versions of popular fairy tales and Petipa ballets. This summer, it offers an ingenious original piece, Boylesque Bullfight, in its own Brooklyn cabaret space. Eight shapely men, attired in little more than jeweled codpieces, corsets, and horned helmets, bring us a jaw-dropping version of Munro Leaf’s 1936 nursery story of Ferdinand, the bull who never learned to fight. The action comes ornamented with soprano Marcy Richardson singing arias from Bizet’s Carmen and a delightful playlist including Tom Waits, Yma Sumac, Gloria Gaynor, and tango tunes. A man-size honeybee rocks point shoes; the very talented performers work out on poles, spiral in Spanish dance styles with lace mantillas and fans, and climax, under a rain of glitter, in a kick-line wearing fake breasts. A blast for all is just about guaranteed.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Sat

7/21

Music

Brimstone & Glory   With Wordless Music Orchestra and Sonido Gallo Negro

Photo: "Brimstone & Glory"

Spare yourself a long, hot, dusty trip to the playa and see some real burning men when the Wordless Music Orchestra performs producer-composer Benh Zeitlin’s score to director Viktor Jakovleski’s 2017 documentary Brimstone & Glory. Filmed in the Mexican town of Tultepec during a week-long celebration, Brimstone focuses on a pair of elaborate annual fireworks displays that inevitably lead to injuries and worse. It also chronicles the unsafe and thoroughly unscientific production of the shells and skyrockets used in these spectacularly colorful pyrotechnic feats. Equally spectacular in its own way, vintage Mexico City psychedelic cumbia combo Sonido Gallo Negro (Black Rooster Sound) gives cha-cha-cha, porro, mambo, and danzón a sci-fi spin with surf guitars, Farfisa organ, and Theremin. Their latest album, Mambo Cósmico, offers a space-age bachelor-pad update of Sun Ra’s sonic spaceways.

Richard Gehr

Film

Dance on Camera Festival

A co-production of the Film Society of Lincoln Center and the Dance Films Association, this year’s festival — its namesake’s 46th — offers sixteen programs encompassing ambitious features and quirky shorts from seventeen countries. In addition to the programs at the giant Walter Reade Theater, free screenings and discussions take place in the FSLC’s Elinor Bunin Monroe Film Center Amphitheater across the street. Grab an all-access pass, another discount package, or single tickets and enjoy the comfy, commercial-free cinema environs.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Batsheva — The Young Ensemble

Straight from a run at the Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival in Massachusetts comes Batsheva — The Young Ensemble, the junior offshoot of Tel Aviv’s leading troupe Batsheva. The outfit brings with them Naharin’s Virus, a Bessie Award–winning piece by Ohad Naharin, who recently announced that he’s stepping down as the company’s director but will continue to choreograph. Adapted from Peter Handke’s play Offending the Audience, the deeply ambiguous work, which had its U.S. premiere in 2002, includes sections of Handke’s text, a huge blackboard at the back of the stage, and other deeply theatrical strategies.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Performance

Boylesque Bullfight

For ten years, Austin McCormick’s peripatetic baroque-burlesque ensemble Company XIV has mounted stunning, raunchy versions of popular fairy tales and Petipa ballets. This summer, it offers an ingenious original piece, Boylesque Bullfight, in its own Brooklyn cabaret space. Eight shapely men, attired in little more than jeweled codpieces, corsets, and horned helmets, bring us a jaw-dropping version of Munro Leaf’s 1936 nursery story of Ferdinand, the bull who never learned to fight. The action comes ornamented with soprano Marcy Richardson singing arias from Bizet’s Carmen and a delightful playlist including Tom Waits, Yma Sumac, Gloria Gaynor, and tango tunes. A man-size honeybee rocks point shoes; the very talented performers work out on poles, spiral in Spanish dance styles with lace mantillas and fans, and climax, under a rain of glitter, in a kick-line wearing fake breasts. A blast for all is just about guaranteed.

Elizabeth Zimmer