Thu

2/22

Fri

2/23

Sat

2/24

Sun

2/25

Mon

2/26

Tue

2/27

Wed

2/28

Today

Thu

2/22

Film

Hush…Hush, Sweet Charlotte

Robert Aldrich, one of the most brilliant cynics ever to direct pictures, gave Warner Bros. one of its biggest hits with What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? (1962). This demi-sequel, starring Bette Davis but subtracting Joan Crawford, also cleaned up — this time for Fox. As he’d already done with jaundiced treatments of decaying American institutions like showbiz, the detective story, and overseas military intervention, the Kiss Me Deadly auteur exploited new dimensions of gothic-horror permissiveness that had been cleared by Hitchcock’s Psycho to erect a monument to the poisoned Southern legacy, whose ghosts endure in living madness, murder, and eminent domain. Stinking sweetly, Hush…Hush, Sweet Charlotte is as busily layered as any great novel, with a new scene-stealer emerging from crooked shadows every five or ten minutes.

Jaime NChristley

Dance

Bebe Miller / Susan Rethorst

Two of America’s wisest choreographers, Bebe Miller and Susan Rethorst, share a program called The Making Room, as well as a process for developing new work. Each shows a new piece developed as part of Miller’s investigative process, and audiences are offered many perspectives on that process before, during, and after the Chelsea season. Miller’s piece, In a Rhythm, takes literary inspiration from Gertrude Stein, Toni Morrison, and David Foster Wallace, exploring how syntax and tone bring meaning. Its cast of six includes dancers from across the country and the modern universe. Rethorst juxtaposes fragments of work from the past thirty years, assessing, in a duet created for Gabrielle Revlock and Gregory Holt, how the pieces work with or against each other.

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Tatyana Tenenbaum

Brooklyn-based Tatyana Tenenbaum’s remarkable oeuvre combines movement with voice. The descendent of Eastern European Jewish immigrants, she grew up in Western Massachusetts considering Broadway musicals her personal folklore, and spent her early years writing musical plays. She now describes herself as both a choreographer and a composer, and calls her new Untitled Work for Voice a “backstage musical.” How, she asks, “can we implicate our cultural patterns of yearning, catharsis, and individualism in order to forge an illicit future?” Her collaborating cast includes Marisa Clementi, Pareena Lim, Emily Moore, and Jules Skloot; the extraordinary Claire Fleury provides the costumes and Kathy Kaufmann the lighting design.

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Jennifer Monson

For thirty-five years, Jennifer Monson has made dances grounded in natural forces, exploring relationships between movement and the environment. She has tracked the migration of birds and of whales, and founded the Interdisciplinary Laboratory for Art, Nature, and Dance (iLAND). In her new bend the even, she collaborates with composers Zeena Parkins and Jeff Kolar, lighting designer Elliott Cennetoglu, scene designer Regina Garcia, costume designer Susan Becker, and dancer Mauriah Kraker to explore “the indeterminate phenomena that exist on the edges of human perception.” Rehearsing outdoors before dawn generated connections among light, music, and movement, creating sensation experienced through the skin and ears as well as through the eyes. The piece, she says, creates a “contemplative environment that shifts from the imperceptible to the sudden.”

—Elizabeth Zimmer 

Music

Mokoomba + Mandingo Ambassadors

Photo:

African dance music, a known therapeutic modality, will raise dopamine levels when Zimbabwean sextet Mokoomba and local Guinean groovers Mandingo Ambassadors kick off BRIC’s new weekly music series, “House Sessions.” Heavy on percussion, with a fine guitarist and bassist in Trustworth Samende and Abundance Mutori, respectively, Mokoomba is fronted by the spitfire singer Mathias Muzaza. The band’s two albums blend gracefully spirited Zimbabwean folk and rock rhythms with an international potpourri that includes reggae, funk, and South African township moves. Their song “Njawane” offers advice on dealing with lions (look them in the eye while walking backward). Acclaimed Guinean griot guitarist Mamady Kouyaté’s Mandingo Ambassadors, a guaranteed pleasure machine of interlocking rhythms and bliss-inducing guitar lines, have been energizing the cozy back room of Park Slope’s Barbès nearly every Wednesday night since 2008.

Richard Gehr

 

Music

Phoebe Bridgers

It makes sense that Julien Baker is a big fan of Los Angeles–based singer-songwriter Phoebe Bridgers. Like Baker, Bridgers makes quiet, personal, wrenchingly sad songs that document intimate feelings and disappointments. Though she’s played music for years, it wasn’t until 2017 that she released her debut album, Stranger in the Alps. Where Bridgers diverges from influences like Baker and Conor Oberst, who also appears on the album, is in her willingness to tread into pop territory, as on the break-up single “Motion Sickness.” If her voice were slightly louder, and the tempo slightly faster, this could be a killer pop punk tune. As it is, it’s a lovely and bitter remembrance of a failed romance.

Sophie Weiner

Music

Pill

Club 57 was an uncategorizable, wildly creative venue on St. Marks Place that helped birth the genre known as no-wave. During its existence, from 1978 to 1983, the tiny theater was home to all kinds of experimental performance and events that pushed partying into the realm of performance art. The Museum of Modern Art is hosting the first major exhibition on the space, on view through April 1. To celebrate, Brooklyn no-wave act Pill will perform at the midtown museum. If any group is a descendent of the chaos that Club 57 birthed, it’s Pill, whose combination of noise, jazz, spoken word, and rock is both political and authentically bohemian.

Sophie Weiner

Fri

2/23

Music

Tal National + Kaleta & Super Yamba Band

Photo: Tal National / JASON CREPS

Fans of the Sahara’s boogieing Tuareg guitars who wish they’d crank it up occasionally will find much to mosh over in Tal National. Niger’s most popular band is a hard-rocking combo formed in 2000 by guitarist (and municipal judge) Hamadal “Almeida” Moumine. Tal recently released its fifth album, Tantabara, a typically polyglot collection of tunes in the Fulani, Hausa, Songhai, and Tuareg tongues. High-speed contrapuntal guitar lines, hard chikita-chikita beats, an mbalax-flavored talking drum, a charming female vocalist, and a traps drummer who can’t/won’t stop, even as his kit is being disassembled around him, all make for a terrifically engaging take on Afrobeat with a hardcore bent. They’re joined here by Kaleta & Super Yamba Band, a local Afro-funk group fronted by the screamingly soulful Benin-born singer Leon Ligan-Majek, a.k.a., Kaleta.

Richard Gehr

Music

Beverly + Wildhoney + Fits + Blush

Beverly are a dream pop band with a shoegazy edge. The group is the brainchild of New York musician Frankie Rose, whose past acts include the great Vivian Girls and Dum Dum Girls. Beverly is a different beast, less focused on vocals or aping a specific aesthetic and more on the low-concept fun of a pure pop song. They’ll play with shoegaze sweethearts Wildhoney, a group whose music transcends their genre and possesses a warmth that many similar-on-paper groups can only aspire to.

Sophie Weiner

Music

Tyler, the Creator + Vince Staples

In 2017, after years of being known as the outsider sticking up his middle finger at mainstream rap (and common decency), Tyler, the Creator redefined himself with the release of Flower Boy. Sonically, the album was more cohesive and lush than anything he had made previously, with string arrangements, harmonized backing vocals, and all sorts of flourishes that never made it into his earlier work. The subject matter was elevated as well: Not only did we learn that Tyler, often accused of homophobia, is probably queer himself; we also got a much more nuanced peek into a psyche that’s usually been reduced to Tyler’s trolling pranks. The new Tyler will perform at Madison Square Garden this week with one of the best rappers alive, Vince Staples.

Sophie Weiner

Dance

Panta Rei Dance Theatre

Norway pays a visit to New York with this American premiere by eighteen-year-old Oslo-based dance theater troupe Panta Rei. Directed by Anne Ekenes, the company arrives downtown with the two-year-old Lullaby, for a trio of men (Gareth Mole, Johnny Autin, and Matias Ronningen), cellist Emery Cardas, and pianist/composer Sverre Indris Joner, sharing the stage with a bunch of chairs. Lively and athletic, it juxtaposes powerful movement (choreographed by Ekenes, Pia Holden, and Hélèn Blackburn) with tender music by Joner, and is said to be a metaphor for our current international political situation.

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Bebe Miller / Susan Rethorst

Two of America’s wisest choreographers, Bebe Miller and Susan Rethorst, share a program called The Making Room, as well as a process for developing new work. Each shows a new piece developed as part of Miller’s investigative process, and audiences are offered many perspectives on that process before, during, and after the Chelsea season. Miller’s piece, In a Rhythm, takes literary inspiration from Gertrude Stein, Toni Morrison, and David Foster Wallace, exploring how syntax and tone bring meaning. Its cast of six includes dancers from across the country and the modern universe. Rethorst juxtaposes fragments of work from the past thirty years, assessing, in a duet created for Gabrielle Revlock and Gregory Holt, how the pieces work with or against each other.

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Tatyana Tenenbaum

Brooklyn-based Tatyana Tenenbaum’s remarkable oeuvre combines movement with voice. The descendent of Eastern European Jewish immigrants, she grew up in Western Massachusetts considering Broadway musicals her personal folklore, and spent her early years writing musical plays. She now describes herself as both a choreographer and a composer, and calls her new Untitled Work for Voice a “backstage musical.” How, she asks, “can we implicate our cultural patterns of yearning, catharsis, and individualism in order to forge an illicit future?” Her collaborating cast includes Marisa Clementi, Pareena Lim, Emily Moore, and Jules Skloot; the extraordinary Claire Fleury provides the costumes and Kathy Kaufmann the lighting design.

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Abby Z and the New Utility

They look more like a wrestling team than like your average dance troupe, but, oddly, they never seem to touch one another. Nine powerful figures in shorts, knee pads, and sneakers storm the stage in Abandoned Playground, a new work by Abby Zbikowski, who teaches at the University of Illinois Champaign at Urbana and last year won the juried Bessie Award. Deeply rhythmic, with glances at tap, hip-hop, post-modern, and West African styles, the company might be a platoon of marines, or Olympic … oh, never mind. Just go to this opening salvo of this year’s five-week Harkness Dance Festival, and watch them let loose.

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Jennifer Monson

For thirty-five years, Jennifer Monson has made dances grounded in natural forces, exploring relationships between movement and the environment. She has tracked the migration of birds and of whales, and founded the Interdisciplinary Laboratory for Art, Nature, and Dance (iLAND). In her new bend the even, she collaborates with composers Zeena Parkins and Jeff Kolar, lighting designer Elliott Cennetoglu, scene designer Regina Garcia, costume designer Susan Becker, and dancer Mauriah Kraker to explore “the indeterminate phenomena that exist on the edges of human perception.” Rehearsing outdoors before dawn generated connections among light, music, and movement, creating sensation experienced through the skin and ears as well as through the eyes. The piece, she says, creates a “contemplative environment that shifts from the imperceptible to the sudden.”

—Elizabeth Zimmer 

Music

Phoebe Bridgers

It makes sense that Julien Baker is a big fan of Los Angeles–based singer-songwriter Phoebe Bridgers. Like Baker, Bridgers makes quiet, personal, wrenchingly sad songs that document intimate feelings and disappointments. Though she’s played music for years, it wasn’t until 2017 that she released her debut album, Stranger in the Alps. Where Bridgers diverges from influences like Baker and Conor Oberst, who also appears on the album, is in her willingness to tread into pop territory, as on the break-up single “Motion Sickness.” If her voice were slightly louder, and the tempo slightly faster, this could be a killer pop punk tune. As it is, it’s a lovely and bitter remembrance of a failed romance.

Sophie Weiner

Music

Monogold + New Myths + Patio + Painted Zeros

Monogold are a Brooklyn group who play dreamy pop with a tinge of psychedelia. The band has referred to their own music as “strange-wave,” but to us, it just sounds fun and catchy. They’ll headline a bill stacked with other great local bands, including New Myths, who play grooving dance pop with icy vocals, and Patio, a confident post-punk band with an appealing strain of apathy. Just another solid, cheap show at your favorite neighborhood venue/bar, Alphaville.

Sophie Weiner

Music

mother!   As Interpreted and Rescored by Macy Rodman

Ridgewood’s queer paradise Dreamhouse hosts another “resoundtracking” by the electronic artist Gooddroid, this time in collaboration with the underground pop diva Macy Rodman. The duo will turn their talents to the recent Darren Aronofsky film mother!, a veritable petri dish of pathos that divided critics and fans. Rodman’s winking take on the movie’s emotional and physical hysteria will certainly be worth checking out.

Sophie Weiner

Music

The Long Count 5-Year Anniversary

For five years, the Long Count Cycle’s parties have infused experimentation into Brooklyn’s underground techno scene. At their events, you’re as likely to hear a noise set as you are to hear a 4/4 beat. And yet the DJs,, including founder DJ Scallywag (who will play at this celebration), manage to keep the crowd engrossed and moving. Sleeparchive, a resident at the punishing Berlin techno club Tresor, is another name to watch out for. As long as you’re willing to experience something out of the usual, you can’t go wrong here.

Sophie Weiner

Sat

2/24

Music

Amy Rigby

Photo: Ted Barron

Few singer-songwriters invite you into their lives as completely as Amy Rigby, who augments her casually autobiographical albums with a charmingly intimate blog. Two decades after Diary of a Mod Housewife, which established her bo-homebody persona and should have made her a household name, the former Sham is back with Old Guys, her first solo release (there’ve been a few with hubby Wreckless Eric in-between) since 2005’s Little Fugitive. The titular geezers include Philip Roth, Bob Dylan, and Robert Altman — artistic idols for the ages. There’s also a lesser-known cast of more neighborly blasts from Rigby’s past, whose stories she recounts sympathetically in her honest and fragile voice. And, as always, there are a couple of brutally honest glances in the mirror. Songwriter, producer, author, and Patti Smith Group guitarist Lenny Kaye kicks things off with a rare solo set.

Richard Gehr

Dance

Abby Z and the New Utility

They look more like a wrestling team than like your average dance troupe, but, oddly, they never seem to touch one another. Nine powerful figures in shorts, knee pads, and sneakers storm the stage in Abandoned Playground, a new work by Abby Zbikowski, who teaches at the University of Illinois Champaign at Urbana and last year won the juried Bessie Award. Deeply rhythmic, with glances at tap, hip-hop, post-modern, and West African styles, the company might be a platoon of marines, or Olympic … oh, never mind. Just go to this opening salvo of this year’s five-week Harkness Dance Festival, and watch them let loose.

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Just in Time

A pair of Berlin-based choreographers who travel under the moniker deufert&plischke have spent the last few years collecting hand-written “letters to dance” from kids, seniors, dancers, travelers — anyone in Berlin, Tel Aviv, and New York whom they could cajole into sharing memories, experiences, and anecdotes about their favorite moments and movements. Folks who attend this free intergenerational community ball will be invited to perform the contributions of other New Yorkers, and some pretty dazzling dance-world icons are showing up, including street dancer Brian “Hallow Dreams” Henry, beloved ballet teacher Janet Panetta, and octogenarian dancer and actress Valda Setterfield. Pianist Alain Franco accompanies Setterfield, and deufert&plischke company member Kareth Schaffer acts as master of ceremonies. Dress to move!

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Music

Tyler, the Creator + Vince Staples

In 2017, after years of being known as the outsider sticking up his middle finger at mainstream rap (and common decency), Tyler, the Creator redefined himself with the release of Flower Boy. Sonically, the album was more cohesive and lush than anything he had made previously, with string arrangements, harmonized backing vocals, and all sorts of flourishes that never made it into his earlier work. The subject matter was elevated as well: Not only did we learn that Tyler, often accused of homophobia, is probably queer himself; we also got a much more nuanced peek into a psyche that’s usually been reduced to Tyler’s trolling pranks. The new Tyler will perform at Madison Square Garden this week with one of the best rappers alive, Vince Staples.

Sophie Weiner

Dance

Panta Rei Dance Theatre

Norway pays a visit to New York with this American premiere by eighteen-year-old Oslo-based dance theater troupe Panta Rei. Directed by Anne Ekenes, the company arrives downtown with the two-year-old Lullaby, for a trio of men (Gareth Mole, Johnny Autin, and Matias Ronningen), cellist Emery Cardas, and pianist/composer Sverre Indris Joner, sharing the stage with a bunch of chairs. Lively and athletic, it juxtaposes powerful movement (choreographed by Ekenes, Pia Holden, and Hélèn Blackburn) with tender music by Joner, and is said to be a metaphor for our current international political situation.

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Bebe Miller / Susan Rethorst

Two of America’s wisest choreographers, Bebe Miller and Susan Rethorst, share a program called The Making Room, as well as a process for developing new work. Each shows a new piece developed as part of Miller’s investigative process, and audiences are offered many perspectives on that process before, during, and after the Chelsea season. Miller’s piece, In a Rhythm, takes literary inspiration from Gertrude Stein, Toni Morrison, and David Foster Wallace, exploring how syntax and tone bring meaning. Its cast of six includes dancers from across the country and the modern universe. Rethorst juxtaposes fragments of work from the past thirty years, assessing, in a duet created for Gabrielle Revlock and Gregory Holt, how the pieces work with or against each other.

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Tatyana Tenenbaum

Brooklyn-based Tatyana Tenenbaum’s remarkable oeuvre combines movement with voice. The descendent of Eastern European Jewish immigrants, she grew up in Western Massachusetts considering Broadway musicals her personal folklore, and spent her early years writing musical plays. She now describes herself as both a choreographer and a composer, and calls her new Untitled Work for Voice a “backstage musical.” How, she asks, “can we implicate our cultural patterns of yearning, catharsis, and individualism in order to forge an illicit future?” Her collaborating cast includes Marisa Clementi, Pareena Lim, Emily Moore, and Jules Skloot; the extraordinary Claire Fleury provides the costumes and Kathy Kaufmann the lighting design.

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Jennifer Monson

For thirty-five years, Jennifer Monson has made dances grounded in natural forces, exploring relationships between movement and the environment. She has tracked the migration of birds and of whales, and founded the Interdisciplinary Laboratory for Art, Nature, and Dance (iLAND). In her new bend the even, she collaborates with composers Zeena Parkins and Jeff Kolar, lighting designer Elliott Cennetoglu, scene designer Regina Garcia, costume designer Susan Becker, and dancer Mauriah Kraker to explore “the indeterminate phenomena that exist on the edges of human perception.” Rehearsing outdoors before dawn generated connections among light, music, and movement, creating sensation experienced through the skin and ears as well as through the eyes. The piece, she says, creates a “contemplative environment that shifts from the imperceptible to the sudden.”

—Elizabeth Zimmer 

Music

Kate Ferencz

Another solid lineup at Bushwick DIY space the Glove, this one starring Kate Ferencz, a solo performer who records charmingly lo-fi Casio-pop. Ferencz is unpredictable but reliable, delving into folk and even gospel on some of her experimental pop songs. Her looped schoolyard-style chants and cheap drum-machine beats are reminiscent of Aughts acts like the Go! Team, but her music feels fresh and all her own.

Sophie Weiner

Sun

2/25

Dance

Noche Flamenca

Photo: PETER GRAHAM

One of the pleasures of living in New York City is knowing that Madrid-born Soledad Barrio, flamenco artist extraordinaire, lives here too; one Sunday I found myself sitting next to her on the subway! Even better to sit in front of her at the Joyce during this two-week season, called Intimo, as she performs the series of duets that make up La Ronde, a variation on the carousel plot of intimate human interactions based on Schnitzler, Bergman, Chekhov, and the 1950 Max Ophüls film, and here choreographed by her husband, Martin Santangelo. Also see solos by her frequent partner, Juan Ogalla, and by Barrio herself, accompanied by a clutch of passionate musicians and singers. (She’s sitting out Saturday matinees, so be careful as you book.)

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Mon

2/26

Dance

Emerging Choreographers

The plethora of dance talent in this city boggles the mind; seventy-nine choreographers auditioned for seven slots in the fifth-annual Emerging Choreographers Series. (An eighth comes from Rome, where the Accademia Nazionale di Danza partners with this series.) The diverse group of performers includes Quilan Arnold, Hannah Button, Ann Dragich, Christopher Nunez, Garrett Parker, Dougie Robbins, Zoe Walters, and Italian visitor Nicoletta Serio, along with returning artist Patrick O’Brien. They are provided with a lot of care and attention by ECS, under the direction of Nicola Iervasi; participants were vetted by one celebrity panel and mentored by another. Concerned by shrinking dance audiences, they’re doing their best to nurture a dance laboratory in Queens.

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Tue

2/27

Film

Film Comment   Selects

Photo: FSLC

Eighteen years young and still eagerly nudging audiences toward discovery, Film Comment Selects” is a film series as pointed act of correction. Curated by Film Comment magazine’s editors, this cinematic showcase is devoted to the underseen, the avoided, and the cast-off. Even this year’s sidebar is an attempt at a resurrection: Five films by Nico Papatakis that are at risk of falling to the scythe of time, among them 1963’s Les Abysses. This visionary provocation, which embodies an elemental immediacy in everything from its performances to its no-less-searing audio-visual embellishments, was based loosely on Jean Genet’s play The Maids and fulsomely boycotted by the Cannes Film Festival’s selection committee.

Ed Gonzalez

Dance

Company Wayne McGregor

Algorithm meets rhythm in Autobiography, the latest smash hit from Brit Wayne McGregor, resident choreographer at London’s Royal Ballet. He’s treating his body as an archive, developing choreographic portraits based on the sequencing of his own genome; every performance is different, but they all feature ten dancers, sets and projections by Ben Cullen WIlliams, and an original electronic score by Jlin. Lucy Carder designs the lights, Aitor Throup the costumes, and Uzma Hameed puzzles out the dramaturgy; the piece is “an abstract meditation on aspects of self, life, and writing.” The Saturday matinee performance is “Pay What You Decide”: Make a reservation for a dollar, and then figure out what it’s worth to you after you see it.

—Elizabeth Zimmer