Thu

6/21

Fri

6/22

Sat

6/23

Sun

6/24

Mon

6/25

Tue

6/26

Wed

6/27

Today

Thu

6/21

Music

Aimee Mann + Superchunk + Jonathan Coulton

Photo: Aimee Mann / Membran

I am ashamed to say I’ve never seen Aimee Mann live, since she’s performed so many iterations of offbeat indie singer-songwriteriness that you’d think we’d have crossed paths in RL by now. (Personal off-the-offbeat favorite: Her rendition of Paul McCartney’s “Too Many People” on a RAM covers album that WFMU released a few years back, which performed the impressive trick of making Sir Paul’s version seem comparatively unschooled in art-pop perfection.) Getting to see her on a BRIC Celebrate Brooklyn! bill with Superchunk is a must-see, as their new album, What a Time to Be Alive, is a masterpiece of punk anti-Trump rage, and they’re one of indie rock’s most unbeatable live bands to boot.

—Neil deMause

Comedy

Hannah Gadsby: Nanette

After a successful run of shows earlier this spring, Australian comedian Hannah Gadsby is back with her explosive stand-up special Nanette — the winner of the Edinburgh Comedy Award at that city’s famous Fringe Festival in 2017 — just in time for Pride Week. Nanette finds Gadsby, who is gay, reorienting our view of who gets to be angry onstage and make people uncomfortable; who gets to dish it, and who has to sit there and take it. The special is very funny, but it almost feels inaccurate to call it a comedy show. It’s more like a humorous treatise on comedy and how it can normalize the status quo. Nanette was released on Netflix on June 19, but don’t miss your chance to see this powerfully compelling show live.

—Lara Zarum

Comedy

The Exposed Bone Workshop

Yes, the title is a mouthful. But Charles O’Leary’s fleet, funny satire The Exposed Bone Workshop Collective Ensemble Studio “Not Just Your Average Theatre Company” Theatre Company Presents: “When Pigs Fly!” A Reading Series of Hot & Spicy New American Plays Written by the Artistic Director adeptly thumbs the now even if that now has become then by the time you’ve read through the play’s name. Presented as a season of staged readings of new plays by a troubled theater company’s vainglorious doof of an a.d., The Exposed Bone uproariously lampoons that most lampoonable of figures: the straight white dude writer (Max Reinhardsen) who just can’t comprehend anyone else’s experience — or how the world has changed. A diverse cast at first embodies and then contests his clueless new dramas and musicals, with Natalie Rich quite literally stopping the show with a for-the-ages (and of-the-moment) expression of deadpan disgust. Afterwards, you’ll likely be humming the inspirational song, crooned by Diane Chen, about how nice it would be to get out of acting and work at HowlRound.

Alan Scherstuhl

Music

Descartes a Kant

CSI: Marriage would have made an apt alternate title for Mexican romance terrorists Descartes a Kant’s recent third album, Victims of Love Propaganda. Fronted by Sandrushka Petrova, who formed the group in Guadalajara in 2001, and Dafne Carballo, the sextet perform exacting, complex, and raucous post-punk music with the genre-capering compulsiveness of combos like Naked City, Mr. Bungle, and the Mothers of Invention. Songs about birthdays, weddings, divorces, therapy, self-image, depression, and self-aware feminist vitriol are delivered with costumed and choreographed precision. Petrova and Carballo’s guitars snarl with echoes of Sonic Youth and Annie Clark, and producer Steve Albini makes Victims sound immediate and vital from opening track (“You Assfucked My Heart”) to the fatalistic closing stanza: “We’ll care until we won’t/I’ll love you until I don’t.”

—Richard Gehr

Film

Clara’s Ghost

Watching Clara’s Ghost, I felt sure I’d seen it all before: matriarch of a prosperous showbiz family lost six feet deep in a sinkhole of depression; wild former child stars cute and innocent no more; reluctant family reunion animated by hereditary alcoholism and a copious quantity of booze. But writer-director Bridey Elliott’s debut feature has more wit and ingenuity than is suggested by its familiar logline. An irregular conceit gives the premise some bite: Elliott plays a thinly veiled version of her own aspiring-actress self, and she has cast her more famous sister (Abby Elliott), once-famous father (Chris Elliott), and distinctly unfamous mother (Paula Elliott) as her carping, drinking, screeching clan. As funhouse-mirror caricature, this family portraiture is unsparing and uproarious. As honest self-reckoning, it is shocking, disturbing, and brave.

Calum Marsh

TV

Detroiters

This delightful Comedy Central series stars Veep’s Sam Richardson and Tim Robinson, formerly of SNL, as two best buds who have a simple dream: to shoot commercials for local businesses in their native Detroit. It’s sweet and funny and a little janky, and the second season premieres Thursday.

Village Voice staff

Fri

6/22

Comedy

The Exposed Bone Workshop

Photo: Crystal Arnette

Yes, the title is a mouthful. But Charles O’Leary’s fleet, funny satire The Exposed Bone Workshop Collective Ensemble Studio “Not Just Your Average Theatre Company” Theatre Company Presents: “When Pigs Fly!” A Reading Series of Hot & Spicy New American Plays Written by the Artistic Director adeptly thumbs the now even if that now has become then by the time you’ve read through the play’s name. Presented as a season of staged readings of new plays by a troubled theater company’s vainglorious doof of an a.d., The Exposed Bone uproariously lampoons that most lampoonable of figures: the straight white dude writer (Max Reinhardsen) who just can’t comprehend anyone else’s experience — or how the world has changed. A diverse cast at first embodies and then contests his clueless new dramas and musicals, with Natalie Rich quite literally stopping the show with a for-the-ages (and of-the-moment) expression of deadpan disgust. Afterwards, you’ll likely be humming the inspirational song, crooned by Diane Chen, about how nice it would be to get out of acting and work at HowlRound.

Alan Scherstuhl

Pride

Outsports Pride

For the third straight year, the sports news website SB Nation is hosting a conference for queer athletes and allies of all ages and levels, from high school junior varsity to major-league professionals. Workshops and panels led by speakers including former NFL player Ryan O’Callaghan and the NFL’s only out assistant coach, Katie Sowers, will promote a message of empowerment and give LGBTQ athletes space to build community.

—Jake Bittle

Film

Buddies

For a stretch of time in the 1980s and ’90s, the word buddy meant, in modern gay life, someone who had agreed to be a friend to a man dying of AIDS. In the 1985 film Buddies, writer-director Arthur J. Bressan Jr. did a simple yet radical thing: He told the story of one such friendship and, in the process, made the first feature-length drama about AIDS. Shot on 16mm film in nine days, Buddies earned respectful reviews and a few festival prizes, but has faded from view over the years. Bressan died of AIDS in July 1987; now, thanks to the efforts of his sister Roe Bressan and film historian Jenni Olson, Buddies has received a 2K digital restoration from Vinegar Syndrome. Thirty-three years after its initial release, the film remains as affecting as ever.

Chuck Wilson

Film

Les Carabiniers

“If Carabiniers had no success in Paris, it’s because people are worms,” Jean-Luc Godard once said about the critical and financial failure of his bizarre 1963 war film. “You show them worms on the screen, they get angry.” It’s a surprisingly raw and angry comment from a filmmaker whose tendency has so often run more toward the gnomic and analytical. But then again, Les Carabiniers is a surprisingly raw and angry film. Now being re-released in an imported 35mm print, this controversial work remains singular in Godard’s filmography. He never made anything else remotely like it.

Bilge Ebiri

Dance

Contemporary Dance Series

Tiffany Rea-Fisher curates free outdoor concerts starting June 22, with multiple dance companies performing nightly on an elevated stage. Assemble a picnic and join the crowds this Friday for a long look at Graham2, Eryc Taylor Dance, the AThomasProject, and dancers from Harlem School of the Arts.  On June 29, catch Mindy Jackson, NOW Dance Project, Clifton Brown, and the Peridance Contemporary Dance Company. The July 6 roster includes Tina Croll + Company, Kate Weare Compay, KineticArchitecture Dance, Bryn Cohn + Artists, and Diva Dance. The series concludes with Hope Boykin Dance, Julia Ehrstrand, Gabrielle Lamb, and Earl Mosely Institute of the Arts on July 20.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Music

R+R=NOW

The jazz pianist Robert Glasper, best known for his work with the likes of Carly Simon, Mos Def, and Kendrick Lamar, returns to the bandshell for the first time since his legendary summer 2014 appearance with Talib Kweli. Glasper will perform with his group R+R=NOW, a/k/a Respect+Respond=NOW, made up of a coterie of underground icons and friends: Terrace Martin, Christian Scott, Tunde Adjuah, Derrick Hodge, Justin Tyson, Taylor McFerrin. Their aim is to create honest music that speaks to the current socio-political climate while channeling a sound influenced by hip-hop, EDM, jazz, and even reggae. The collective will also premiere a new piece of music, The Liberation Suite, which BRIC commissioned the group to write specifically for this show. The Brooklyn-based Haitian-American singer Paul Beaubrun opens the program.

—Nicole DeMarco

Performance

Company XIV

For ten years, Austin McCormick’s peripatetic baroque burlesque ensemble has mounted its own stunning, raunchy versions of popular fairy tales and Petipa ballets. This summer, it offers an ingenious original piece, Boylesque Bullfight, in its own Brooklyn cabaret space. Eight shapely men, attired in little more than jeweled codpieces, corsets, and horned helmets, bring us a jaw-dropping version of Munro Leaf’s 1937 nursery story of Ferdinand, the bull who never learned to fight, ornamented by soprano Marcy Richardson singing arias from Bizet’s Carmen and a delightful playlist featuring Tom Waits, Yma Sumac, Gloria Gaynor, tango tunes, and more. A man-size honeybee rocks point shoes; the talented performers work out on poles, spiral in Spanish dance styles with lace mantillas and fans, and climax, under a rain of glitter, in a kick-line wearing fake breasts. No matter your sexual orientation or gender identity, you’ll have a blast.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Comedy

Hannah Gadsby: Nanette

After a successful run of shows earlier this spring, Australian comedian Hannah Gadsby is back with her explosive stand-up special Nanette — the winner of the Edinburgh Comedy Award at that city’s famous Fringe Festival in 2017 — just in time for Pride Week. Nanette finds Gadsby, who is gay, reorienting our view of who gets to be angry onstage and make people uncomfortable; who gets to dish it, and who has to sit there and take it. The special is very funny, but it almost feels inaccurate to call it a comedy show. It’s more like a humorous treatise on comedy and how it can normalize the status quo. Nanette was released on Netflix on June 19, but don’t miss your chance to see this powerfully compelling show live.

—Lara Zarum

Film

The Departure

“The goal is for you to experience ‘departure,’ ” Rinzai Zen monk Ittetsu Nemoto tells the visitors to his temple in rural Japan early in The Departure. “Today, we’re holding this retreat for you to find out what it means to die.” Lana Wilson’s follow-up to the deeply empathetic documentary After Tiller (a survey of the work and patients of the few American doctors left performing late-term abortions, co-directed with Martha Shane) is another intimate, clear-eyed study of people facing the hardest of choices — in this case, the decision to continue to live.

Alan Scherstuhl

Pride

Fantasy: Leather Edition

Get those boots and harnesses ready: The fourth annual Pride megaparty will be leather-themed this year, a significant improvement over last year’s theme of “Men at Work.” The bash will be hosted at Slate, a massive bar in the Flatiron district usually known for its billiards, and will feature multiple DJs plus “secret acts,” as well as VIP seating and bottle service for the big spenders. Must be 21 or older.

—Jake Bittle

Sat

6/23

Art

Maren Hassinger: Monuments

Photo: Maren Hassinger, “Study for Monuments,” 2018 (detail) / COURTESY THE ARTIST

Starting in June, the Studio Museum in Harlem presents “Maren Hassinger: Monuments,” which includes eight new sculptures, in Marcus Garvey Park, by the artist, who has a long association with the museum (she was an artist-in-residence in 1984). Similar to some of her previous works, the new sculptures will be made from tree branches that Hassinger found around the city, and which will be fashioned into objects, with help from New York high school students, just prior to when the exhibit opens. This sort of civic engagement has long been on the artist’s mind. In 2015, during a retrospective of her work in Atlanta, she said she wanted to get back to the ideals of the civil rights movement, and “to concentrate on issues and environments where we all have a common interest.” What better place to do that than in a New York City public park?

—Pac Pobric

Film

At the Edge of Russia

The intimacy that develops amid desolation is at the heart of Polish director Michal Marczak’s At the Edge of Russia (2010), a mesmerizing look at life in a tiny, ramshackle military encampment along the country’s snowbound Arctic border. There, a fresh-faced young recruit is trained to survive in the freezing weather — at one point, he has to spend two nights inside a hole in the ice — while also encouraged to bond with the older soldiers around him. These rough men still carry vestiges of their culture within them: They sing folk tunes, quote Lermontov and Lope de Vega poems, and joke around affectionately. But madness and violence are not far. Late in the film, one officer begins to ruminate on his wife’s infidelity, and what he intends to do to her when he returns.

Bilge Ebiri

Pride

Pride Island

Pier 97 in Hell’s Kitchen will transform into a “central hub” for the city’s Pride Week festivities, including a two-day music festival, “Pride Island,” featuring artists from various genres. The Sunday concert, headlined by Kylie Minogue, has already sold out, but tickets are still available for Saturday’s show, which will feature Swedish pop artist Tove Lo (of “Habits” fame) and the fantastic Minnesota alt-hip-hop artist Lizzo, known for her sex-positive jams.

—Jake Bittle

Dance

Mark Morris: Beginner Salsa

The redoubtable choreographer displays his precious resources in two boroughs this summer, offering free events at both his own Brooklyn facility and Lincoln Center, and an expensive one during August’s Mostly Mozart festival. This Saturday, show up at 3 Lafayette Avenue in Brooklyn at 5 p.m. for a free open-level Salsa class, taught by Bethina Flores, followed by a dance party with refreshments and live music by the Malec Heermans Latin Group. All that and you’ll be home before dark.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Comedy

Hannah Gadsby: Nanette

After a successful run of shows earlier this spring, Australian comedian Hannah Gadsby is back with her explosive stand-up special Nanette — the winner of the Edinburgh Comedy Award at that city’s famous Fringe Festival in 2017 — just in time for Pride Week. Nanette finds Gadsby, who is gay, reorienting our view of who gets to be angry onstage and make people uncomfortable; who gets to dish it, and who has to sit there and take it. The special is very funny, but it almost feels inaccurate to call it a comedy show. It’s more like a humorous treatise on comedy and how it can normalize the status quo. Nanette was released on Netflix on June 19, but don’t miss your chance to see this powerfully compelling show live.

—Lara Zarum

Film

En el Séptimo Día

Jim McKay‘s En el Séptimo Día concerns José (Fernando Cardona), the star player on a nine-a-side team of mostly undocumented workers from Puebla, Mexico. José is grasping at a sporting glory rather more muted than what will be on display at the World Cup, but which is, nevertheless, a profound source of pleasure, achievement, and grace — the high point of a week otherwise spent biking across Brooklyn, delivering paper-in-plastic takeout bags filled with upscale Mexican food. But, suddenly, a dilemma: The league’s championship game is approaching the following Sunday, José’s usual day of rest, and his boss is demanding everyone show up for an important private party. Over the weekend-to-weekend timeline of the film, José weighs his responsibilities at work and to his friends and teammates.

—Mark Asch

Comedy

The Exposed Bone Workshop

Yes, the title is a mouthful. But Charles O’Leary’s fleet, funny satire The Exposed Bone Workshop Collective Ensemble Studio “Not Just Your Average Theatre Company” Theatre Company Presents: “When Pigs Fly!” A Reading Series of Hot & Spicy New American Plays Written by the Artistic Director adeptly thumbs the now even if that now has become then by the time you’ve read through the play’s name. Presented as a season of staged readings of new plays by a troubled theater company’s vainglorious doof of an a.d., The Exposed Bone uproariously lampoons that most lampoonable of figures: the straight white dude writer (Max Reinhardsen) who just can’t comprehend anyone else’s experience — or how the world has changed. A diverse cast at first embodies and then contests his clueless new dramas and musicals, with Natalie Rich quite literally stopping the show with a for-the-ages (and of-the-moment) expression of deadpan disgust. Afterwards, you’ll likely be humming the inspirational song, crooned by Diane Chen, about how nice it would be to get out of acting and work at HowlRound.

Alan Scherstuhl

Sun

6/24

Film

The Invisible Man

Photo: Photofest

Hollywood special effects peaked in the Thirties — when the waning otherworldliness of celluloid synthesized perfectly with the torrential rollout of innovative practical and optical illusions — and few directors of that era could make you doubt your own mind like James Whale. His 1933 film of The Invisible Man, brisk as a cold morning walk, all but vibrates with macabre delight, as R.C. Sherriff’s script inflates H.G. Wells’s troubled scientist first into a mischief-maker, then later into a mass murderer and arsonist. You won’t know if you’re falling up the stairs or tipping into a ravine. But the film shrewdly front-loads the main event: Claude Rains cackling as he strips off his bandages to reveal a double void of corporeality and scruples. The uncanny hybrid of wonder and gravity of the ageless visual trickery binds us to Griffin, even when our subsequent complicity makes us feel a little sick.

—Jaime N. Christley

Film

Blood

In 2013’s Blood, directed by Alina Rudnitskaya — one of the great documentarians of our time, and a director with four remarkable films in this retrospective — we follow a group of female nurses as they travel through Russia’s northwestern reaches, drawing blood from townspeople, many of whom make these donations simply to earn a few much-needed rubles. Blood is a film of literal collapse: Over and over again, the donors — malnourished, impoverished, ill — faint as their blood is withdrawn. These communities, such as they are, seem to be at the end of their rope. By contrast, the nurses themselves remain close; Rudnitskaya regularly shows them cutting loose at night. As they travel through a country that seems ever more forbidding and unforgiving, their own sense of belonging becomes stronger.

Bilge Ebiri

Film

The Mother

In Antoine Cattin and Pavel Kostomarov’s 2007 documentary, a middle-aged dairy worker, fleeing abuse, desperately tries to hold her family of nine together in the forsaken Russian countryside. Faced with poverty and rejection at every turn, and saddled with children who are starving, Lyuba is a figure of both resolute dignity and stark honesty: She speaks of the dreams she once had, and of how all her other ambitions were dashed over the years. And yet she demonstrates a strange optimism, an articulate, reflective self-knowledge. At times, we might even mistake her for a metaphor for the country itself — but that would be unfair to the specificity and urgency of her portrayal. She is, sadly, all too real.

Bilge Ebiri

Film

Chained for Life

Aaron Schimberg’s Chained for Life bears all the usual hallmarks of a New York indie of the post–Kim’s Video era: sumptuous 16mm cinematography, razor-sharp script, extravagant opening titles. But don’t be deceived: The sensibility is strictly sui generis. Chained for Life begins as ripe movie-business satire in the tradition of The Player, though with “sophisticated” international art-house fare as its target rather than Hollywood backlots. A snide, much-deferred-to foreign auteur (Charlie Korsmo) mounting his American debut wants to find his (dubious) idea of beauty in his (offensive) idea of ugly, which of course entails variously insulting, patronizing, and condescending behavior toward his largely disabled cast of hospital-bound “freaks.” Chief among them is Rosenthal (Under the Skin’s Adam Pearson), whose efforts to remain professional among co-stars Mabel (Jess Weixler) and Max (The Mend’s Stephen Plunkett, hilarious) is the heart of the film.

Calum Marsh

Pride

Pride Week Satanic Bingo

If you’ve never heard of Satanic Bingo, you’re welcome: It’s a regular event in Bushwick that combines bingo, typically seen as a more sedate activity, with raucous sideshows, burlesque performances, and tarot readings. The organizers are upping the ante in honor of Pride Week with an especially eccentric show; a bevy of prizes including paddles and wax will be on offer for bingo winners.

—Jake Bittle

Performance

Becca Blackwell: They, Themself and Schmerm

Back in February, the trans writer and performer Becca Blackwell brought their one-person show They, Themself and Schmerm to Joe’s Pub, where it promptly sold out and earned enthusiastic notices for its melding of forms (memoir-ish stand-up, audience-participation segments) and its frank unpacking of gender fluidity. In a 2012 interview with the Voice, Blackwell remarked, of their experience of being a performance artist in New York, “As someone who doesn’t fit into a binary of male or female it can be very frustrating because most work is based in those two categories only.” Six years on, Blackwell’s wrestlings with these matters are still just as politically urgent and comedically lively. (“I’m trans,” they say in one segment posted to YouTube, “but I’ll let you figure out which one.”) So after a week of outdoor-heavy Pride events, cozy up in the confines of Joe’s Pub, where two encore performances of They, Themself and Schmerm await audiences.

—Danny King

Mon

6/25

Film

Leave No Trace

Photo: Bleecker Street

Earlier this year, Debra Granik returned to Sundance with Leave No Trace, another movie (like Granik’s Winter’s Bone) focusing on the experiences of a young woman living on the margins of society — this time, a thirteen-year-old trying to survive in the woods with her father. It might not have the genre elements that helped make Winter’s Bone a breakout, but Leave No Trace rivets in its own way. Right from the early scenes, we can feel the delicate power of Granik’s visual storytelling: As we see the propane tanks and apple boxes and shelves and tarps that father and daughter (played by the intense and excellent Ben Foster and the staggeringly good Kiwi actress Thomasin McKenzie, respectively) have gathered, we don’t need to be told that these two are not just out camping; they live in the woods. And just like that, we’re enveloped in the perplexing drama of surviving on the edge.

Bilge Ebiri

Tue

6/26

Performance

Becca Blackwell: They, Themself and Schmerm

Photo: Allison Michael Orenstein

Back in February, the trans writer and performer Becca Blackwell brought their one-person show They, Themself and Schmerm to Joe’s Pub, where it promptly sold out and earned enthusiastic notices for its melding of forms (memoir-ish stand-up, audience-participation segments) and its frank unpacking of gender fluidity. In a 2012 interview with the Voice, Blackwell remarked, of their experience of being a performance artist in New York, “As someone who doesn’t fit into a binary of male or female it can be very frustrating because most work is based in those two categories only.” Six years on, Blackwell’s wrestlings with these matters are still just as politically urgent and comedically lively. (“I’m trans,” they say in one segment posted to YouTube, “but I’ll let you figure out which one.”) So after a week of outdoor-heavy Pride events, cozy up in the confines of Joe’s Pub, where two encore performances of They, Themself and Schmerm await audiences.

—Danny King

Comedy

W. Kamau Bell: Private School Negro

If you literally cannot bring yourself to turn on CNN these days but still crave your dose of W. Kamau Bell, fear not: Netflix has a new standup special from the comic and host of United Shades of America, out Tuesday.

Village Voice staff

Wed

6/27

Comedy

Hannah Gadsby: Nanette

Photo: Carol Rosegg

After a successful run of shows earlier this spring, Australian comedian Hannah Gadsby is back with her explosive stand-up special Nanette — the winner of the Edinburgh Comedy Award at that city’s famous Fringe Festival in 2017 — just in time for Pride Week. Nanette finds Gadsby, who is gay, reorienting our view of who gets to be angry onstage and make people uncomfortable; who gets to dish it, and who has to sit there and take it. The special is very funny, but it almost feels inaccurate to call it a comedy show. It’s more like a humorous treatise on comedy and how it can normalize the status quo. Nanette was released on Netflix on June 19, but don’t miss your chance to see this powerfully compelling show live.

—Lara Zarum

Comedy

Los Profesores: ¡En Vacaciones!   + Hockey Cops

This cheery, daft, trenchant bilingual comedy show kicks off with a can’t-miss conceit and then only gets cheerier, dafter, more trenchant — and funnier. Upbeat young Spanish teachers Pedro Alcocer and Erica Hernandez are here to teach the audience the real Spanish, the Spanish we might need on a trip to Latin America. Their model: The blandly upbeat dialogos in American Spanish classes, where two speakers work dutifully through basic vocabulary in settings like la bibliotecha. (Always la bibliotecha!) Writers/performers Alcocer and Hernandez tear through each line in both Spanish and English, creating fresh, surprising comedy out of cognates, conjugation, adjective order, and how to really roll those Rs when pronouncing gonorrea. The show’s a dizzy, fizzing duet, profane as hell and also sweetly earnest, relentlessly inventive and wholly unpredictable. This week, ¡En Vacaciones! is paired with Hockey Cops, a sketch show about two cops who conduct their business on roller blades — and starring two comics, Matthew Van Orden and Andrew Ashbrook Freed, who have serious skating skills.

—Alan Scherstuhl and Lara Zarum