Wed

1/24

Thu

1/25

Fri

1/26

Sat

1/27

Sun

1/28

Mon

1/29

Tue

1/30

Today

Wed

1/24

Dance

Kader Attou–Company Accrorap

Photo: João Garcia

This French-Algerian troupe of eleven male hip-hop dancers makes its U.S. debut with The Roots. Directed and choreographed by “dance smuggler” Kader Attou, it combines hip-hop with circus, contemporary dance, and graphic arts. Blending his own Mediterranean culture with the French accents of the Centre Chorégraphic National in La Rochelle, which he’s been directing for the past ten years, Attou takes New York–born hip-hop and blends it with a host of other influences to create this new piece, which has an original sound score by Régis Ballet and Diaphane. Meet the director and the dancers at a post-curtain chat on Wednesday evening.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Performance

Dean Moss

The world premiere of Dean Moss’s greatly anticipated seventy-minute Petra, described as a “masochistic autobiographical meditation on desire,” and inspired by Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s film The Bitter Tears of Petra von Kant, features a cast of female immigrants well known in the downtown dance community, including Mina Nishimura, Sari Nordman, Kaneza Schaal, Samita Sinha, and Paz Tanjuaquio. Collaborating on video are Julia Cumming, Cassie Mey, Marya Warshaw, and Asher Woodworth; ten other artists contribute to the production, one of the last in this year’s Coil festival at the newly reopened and renamed Performance Space New York.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Thu

1/25

Film

Memories of Underdevelopment

Photo: Courtesy Film Forum

Cuban director Tomas Gutierrez Alea’s Memories of Underdevelopment, from 1968, is one of the greatest pictures ever made, and it’s screening in a new restoration at Film Forum that you shouldn’t miss. Don’t be surprised, however, if what you’re watching doesn’t always look brand new, or slick, or clean. Though fictional, Alea’s film mixes a variety of forms, incorporating both documentary footage shot by the director on the streets of Havana as well as archival historical images. As such, it’s also often purposefully grainy, washed out, imperfect. Alternating between immediacy and reflection, fantasy and honesty, lyricism and horror, Memories of Underdevelopment feels like it’s being created before our very eyes.

Bilge Ebiri

Music

Sløtface

From their sound alone, you’d never guess that Sløtface were anything other than an American post-Paramore pop-punk outfit. But as the name’s slashed o hints at, the group is actually Norwegian, hailing from the southwestern city of Stavanger. Lead singer Haley Shea’s sweet pop star, along with her bandmates’ furious riffs and breakdowns, will bring you back to the Warped Tours of your youth. Sløtface are also known for their feminist politics: Their original name, Slutface, was inspired by the provocations of the riot grrrl movement. It’s hard to imagine a group that’d be more fun to mosh to — especially for women who sometimes are hesitant to get in the pit.

Sophie Weiner

Music

Jamie Saft

Few pianists in modern jazz can mix it up like our man in the Shawangunk Mountains, Mr. Jamie Saft. For the last 25 years, the Queens native has worked with an exceptionally wide range of artists, from jazz giants like John Zorn to Upstate rock royalty like Garth Hudson to experimental metal icons like Merzbow and Mike Patton. (And that’s just a sampling.) He’s the rare classic pianist who feels just as comfortable behind a wall of noise or soaking in a bottomless pool of dub frequencies as he is in the calm cool of the traditional modal style. For his latest LP, however, he follows in the great customary lineage of Bill Evans, Art Tatum, and Herbie Hancock, fashioning his very first album for solo piano: Solo a Genova, a recital recorded at the Teatro Carlo Felice in Genova, Italy, last year. On it, Saft delivers thoughtful renditions of his own material (“The New Standard,” “Pinkus”) and of jazz standards (Coltrane’s “Naima,” the Bill Evans–penned “Blue in Green”). He also colors boldly outside the lines in his choices of non-jazz-related material; surprises include a jubilant version of “The Makings of You” by Curtis Mayfield  and an abstract translation of the iconic ZZ Top smash “Sharp Dressed Man.” It will be a treat to see where he takes these tunes when he brings the piano-recital experience to Brooklyn’s Owl Music Parlor.

Ron Hart

Performance

Dean Moss

The world premiere of Dean Moss’s greatly anticipated seventy-minute Petra, described as a “masochistic autobiographical meditation on desire,” and inspired by Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s film The Bitter Tears of Petra von Kant, features a cast of female immigrants well known in the downtown dance community, including Mina Nishimura, Sari Nordman, Kaneza Schaal, Samita Sinha, and Paz Tanjuaquio. Collaborating on video are Julia Cumming, Cassie Mey, Marya Warshaw, and Asher Woodworth; ten other artists contribute to the production, one of the last in this year’s Coil festival at the newly reopened and renamed Performance Space New York.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Music

Big Bliss + Sic Tic

If you’re looking for a new favorite local band, Big Bliss is probably a good bet. This is particularly true for fans of the Cure, who will find much to appreciate in Big Bliss’ wailing vocals, morbid lyrics, and sparkling guitars. But this group isn’t just an homage — their gothy vibe is paired with a post-punk edge, expertly mining a blend of sweet, spooky, and serious. They’ll headline this Brooklyn Bazaar show with Sic Tic, who play roaring, sludgy psych-rock.

Sophie Weiner

Music

Zs 15 Year Anniversary Show

The mercurial New York experimental group Zs may be celebrating their fifteen-year anniversary at H0L0 this week, but they remain as difficult as ever to pin down. The shape-shifting outfit makes music that sometimes feels like rhythmic sound art, and other times veers towards free jazz or math rock. What the results never are are boring. Their most recent album, Xe, was their first with Guardian Alien drummer Greg Fox, who adds his precise and innovative sound to their constantly mutating project. They’ll play with equally fascinating friends to celebrate this milestone.

Sophie Weiner

Dance

Kader Attou–Company Accrorap

This French-Algerian troupe of eleven male hip-hop dancers makes its U.S. debut with The Roots. Directed and choreographed by “dance smuggler” Kader Attou, it combines hip-hop with circus, contemporary dance, and graphic arts. Blending his own Mediterranean culture with the French accents of the Centre Chorégraphic National in La Rochelle, which he’s been directing for the past ten years, Attou takes New York–born hip-hop and blends it with a host of other influences to create this new piece, which has an original sound score by Régis Ballet and Diaphane. Meet the director and the dancers at a post-curtain chat on Wednesday evening.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Kei Takei

For the third year in a row, Lumberyard Contemporary Performing Arts, an emerging arts facility in Catskill, New York, is taking over space in town to bring us artists too long missing from local stages. Its three-week 2018 Winter Festival opens with Japanese performer Kei Takei, who brings her company Moving Earth Orient Sphere back to this country for the first time in seventeen years. They’ll show us a recent work, LIGHT, Part 44 (Bamboo Forest), a new section of an evolving piece begun in 1969; completing the program will be a solo from LIGHT, Part 8 (1974), another section of Takei’s now-more-than-24-hour-long “dance diary,” a masterwork of probing choreography.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Jessica diMauro

Time, Jessica diMauro has written, “is not kind to women.” Her modern-dance troupe, DiMauro Dance, offers a glimpse at how she deals with this conundrum in I’m Not Done Yet, in which she wonders how timing controls our lives, and how the pressures of a ticking clock manifest physically. Zach Marks provides live music; David Lovett designs the lights; and among the performers are Davon Chance, Crystal Lynn Rodriguez, Najee Stephenson, and Alexandra Williamson.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Catherine Cabeen / Hyphen

Catherine Cabeen’s new seventy-minute project investigates how desires shape our identity and vice versa. Give Me More plays out in three parts: “Glitter in the Gutter,” “The American Koan,” and “…yet again.” The first section is a duet for Cabeen herself and Kristina Berger; the central section involves seven dancers (Cabeen, Nya Bowman, Darby Canessa, Hector Cerna, Sarah Lustbader, Kathryn MacLellan, and Trebien Pollard) and has music by Mark Katsaounis, lighting by Philip Trevino, and two hundred pounds of recycled clothing. The final section’s a solo for the choreographer.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Music

Frank Zappa: Rebel / Respect / Response

Homage will be observed and influences recalibrated when the Lucerne Festival presents Frank Zappa: Rebel / Respect / Response. The two-day modernist hoedown, conducted by Matthias Pintscher and performed by the Lucerne Festival Alumni ensemble (with Tyshawn Sorey providing percussive fireworks), kicks off Thursday with performances of four “serious” Zappa works (including The Perfect Stranger and “Naval Aviation in Art?”), preceded by Olga Neuwirth’s Eleanor. The Austrian composer’s Zappa-influenced montage of blues, Martin Luther King Jr. speeches, and June Jordan’s poetry was inspired, she says, by the brutal Charlie Hebdo attack of 2015, and it features Della Miles singing an uptown version of Billie Holiday. The sophisticated fun continues Friday with more work by Zappa (“Get Whitey,” “G-Spot Tornado,” among others); by Zappa touchstone Edgard Varèse (Intégrales); and by fellow travelers Pierre Boulez (Éclat) and John Zorn (For Your Eyes Only).

Richard Gehr

Fri

1/26

Nightlife

Fix Your Hearts or Die: A Pre-Valentine’s Twin Peaks Night

Photo: Photofest

Costumes and cosplay are encouraged at Fix Your Hearts or Die: A Pre-Valentine’s Twin Peaks Night, so why not wrap yourself in garbage bags, grab a log, and embrace the Peaks’ sexy, tragic, and enigmatic pine-scented atmosphere? Angelo Badalamenti’s jazz-pop-electronic score was of course an integral part of the TP experience, so electro trio A Place Both Wonderful and Strange will perform “The Laura Palmer Deviations,” a dark, dissonant re-creation (featuring burlesque badass Liberty Rose) of Laura’s tragic final moments that was commissioned by the David Lynch Foundation. Outsider academic Stef Black will deliver a talk entitled “About the Bunny: On the Screen as Mirror in Twin Peaks,” and the DJ Knifesex (a co-founder of urban witchcraft practitioners New Jack Witch) will transport you to the Road House, lair of enraptured zombie-eyed clubizens.

Richard Gehr

Performance

Dean Moss

The world premiere of Dean Moss’s greatly anticipated seventy-minute Petra, described as a “masochistic autobiographical meditation on desire,” and inspired by Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s film The Bitter Tears of Petra von Kant, features a cast of female immigrants well known in the downtown dance community, including Mina Nishimura, Sari Nordman, Kaneza Schaal, Samita Sinha, and Paz Tanjuaquio. Collaborating on video are Julia Cumming, Cassie Mey, Marya Warshaw, and Asher Woodworth; ten other artists contribute to the production, one of the last in this year’s Coil festival at the newly reopened and renamed Performance Space New York.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Music

Snail Mail

Though young adults are often lectured about wasting the “best years of their lives,” D.C.-based indie pop group Snail Mail knows that’s not true. “Baby when I’m thirty I’ll laugh about how dumb it felt/Baby when I’m thirty I’ll laugh it out,” lead singer Lindsey Jordan sings drolly on their song “Dirt,” acknowledging that being a teenager is actually really crappy. The guiding sentiments on these straightforward, plaintive songs — uncertainty, self-doubt — should be familiar to anyone who has ever been young. But Jordan presents these feelings with an air of self-awareness that demonstrates a maturity beyond her years. For young adults surfing the waves of bullshit life can throw at you, that’s the best you can hope for.

Sophie Weiner

Music

Frank Zappa: Rebel / Respect / Response

Homage will be observed and influences recalibrated when the Lucerne Festival presents Frank Zappa: Rebel / Respect / Response. The two-day modernist hoedown, conducted by Matthias Pintscher and performed by the Lucerne Festival Alumni ensemble (with Tyshawn Sorey providing percussive fireworks), kicks off Thursday with performances of four “serious” Zappa works (including The Perfect Stranger and “Naval Aviation in Art?”), preceded by Olga Neuwirth’s Eleanor. The Austrian composer’s Zappa-influenced montage of blues, Martin Luther King Jr. speeches, and June Jordan’s poetry was inspired, she says, by the brutal Charlie Hebdo attack of 2015, and it features Della Miles singing an uptown version of Billie Holiday. The sophisticated fun continues Friday with more work by Zappa (“Get Whitey,” “G-Spot Tornado,” among others); by Zappa touchstone Edgard Varèse (Intégrales); and by fellow travelers Pierre Boulez (Éclat) and John Zorn (For Your Eyes Only).

Richard Gehr

Dance

Kader Attou–Company Accrorap

This French-Algerian troupe of eleven male hip-hop dancers makes its U.S. debut with The Roots. Directed and choreographed by “dance smuggler” Kader Attou, it combines hip-hop with circus, contemporary dance, and graphic arts. Blending his own Mediterranean culture with the French accents of the Centre Chorégraphic National in La Rochelle, which he’s been directing for the past ten years, Attou takes New York–born hip-hop and blends it with a host of other influences to create this new piece, which has an original sound score by Régis Ballet and Diaphane. Meet the director and the dancers at a post-curtain chat on Wednesday evening.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Catherine Cabeen / Hyphen

Catherine Cabeen’s new seventy-minute project investigates how desires shape our identity and vice versa. Give Me More plays out in three parts: “Glitter in the Gutter,” “The American Koan,” and “…yet again.” The first section is a duet for Cabeen herself and Kristina Berger; the central section involves seven dancers (Cabeen, Nya Bowman, Darby Canessa, Hector Cerna, Sarah Lustbader, Kathryn MacLellan, and Trebien Pollard) and has music by Mark Katsaounis, lighting by Philip Trevino, and two hundred pounds of recycled clothing. The final section’s a solo for the choreographer.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Music

Cloud Cult

The Minnesota band Cloud Cult, fronted by Craig Minowa, is the very definition of “extra.” Armed with at least eight members and many more instruments, Minowa has spent two decades releasing epic, often conceptual albums comprised of acoustic folk, experimental rock, electronica, sweeping orchestral flourishes, and pop turns, all overlayed with deeply emotional lyrics that address subjects like existential loss. Somehow, it works, and, over their career, Cloud Cult have developed, well, a cult following. Their live shows are near-religious experiences, complete with a live painter who auctions off his ad hoc work after each performance. They will more than fill the gorgeous Appel Room space overlooking Columbus Circle.

Sophie Weiner

Sat

1/27

Dance

Catherine Cabeen / Hyphen

Photo: Pamela Wolff

Catherine Cabeen’s new seventy-minute project investigates how desires shape our identity and vice versa. Give Me More plays out in three parts: “Glitter in the Gutter,” “The American Koan,” and “…yet again.” The first section is a duet for Cabeen herself and Kristina Berger; the central section involves seven dancers (Cabeen, Nya Bowman, Darby Canessa, Hector Cerna, Sarah Lustbader, Kathryn MacLellan, and Trebien Pollard) and has music by Mark Katsaounis, lighting by Philip Trevino, and two hundred pounds of recycled clothing. The final section’s a solo for the choreographer.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Music

Destroyer

Destroyer, the stage name that musician Dan Bejar has used for his now-twenty-plus-year career, has always made music with a sensibility that rubs some people the wrong way. His nasally voice, bizarre lyrics, and sometimes unusual structures are singular. But he’s also an incredible pop songwriter when he wants to be, as on his Eighties-soft-rock-inspired 2011 Kaputt. That album was remarkable for both the catchy songs and its overall aura of seediness, a combination that gives you a funny feeling that’s hard to shake. He’s in a similar mode on his most recent, Ken, where he again sings from the perspective of a mysterious lothario, leading you through a dark underworld.

Sophie Weiner

Music

Ecstatic Music Festival

It’s time for the yearly Ecstatic Music Festival, a series of shows at Merkin Concert Hall on the Upper West Side that curates artists who toe the line between indie and experimental. The endlessly transforming Xenia Rubinos — whose 2016 album Black Terry Catmixed soul, jazz, pop, r&b, and radical politics, and deserved far more attention than it received — will headline the festival’s first outing. Rubinos will be backed up by Adam Schatz, the creative force behind Brooklyn indie rock group Landlady, who will perform with his project Civil Engineering, a big-band effort comprised of many musicians and lots of improvisation.

Sophie Weiner

Performance

Dean Moss

The world premiere of Dean Moss’s greatly anticipated seventy-minute Petra, described as a “masochistic autobiographical meditation on desire,” and inspired by Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s film The Bitter Tears of Petra von Kant, features a cast of female immigrants well known in the downtown dance community, including Mina Nishimura, Sari Nordman, Kaneza Schaal, Samita Sinha, and Paz Tanjuaquio. Collaborating on video are Julia Cumming, Cassie Mey, Marya Warshaw, and Asher Woodworth; ten other artists contribute to the production, one of the last in this year’s Coil festival at the newly reopened and renamed Performance Space New York.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Music

Moon King

Moon King, a project of the musician Daniel Benjamin, is one of the few acts who can accurately be described as “shoegaze-meets–electro-pop.” Benjamin’s earlier releases tended towards the former, with filtered vocals over guitars and plenty of fuzz to go around. His last release, Hamtramck ’16, documented his move from Toronto to Detroit with an album that feels tonally similar while simultaneously totally different stylistically  it’s lo-fi electro-pop in the vein of Casiotone for the Painfully Alone. His newest track, “I’ve Stopped Believing,” is even further from his roots in intimate shoegaze — this one’s full-on pop, albeit with a homemade feel, as Benjamin describes leaving his home city, which has become unrecognizable due to gentrification.

Sophie Weiner

Music

Aurora Halal + HUERCO S. + Patricia + Galcher Lustwerk + Bookworms + DJ Python + Ultrafog

We can’t explain why a lineup of so many heavy-hitters in the underground techno scene will descend on Bossa Nova’s intimate space this weekend, but we aren’t asking questions. Mystical techno queen Aurora Halal will bring her expansive dance music. Huerco S., who explores realms of mesmerizing ambient techno, will also play live. Almost everyone else on the docket is equally revered in the scene: No matter when you stop in, you can’t go wrong. This is a rare early show at Bossa; we’d recommend showing up even earlier in order to get in— this one is going to get packed, fast.

Sophie Weiner

Dance

Kader Attou–Company Accrorap

This French-Algerian troupe of eleven male hip-hop dancers makes its U.S. debut with The Roots. Directed and choreographed by “dance smuggler” Kader Attou, it combines hip-hop with circus, contemporary dance, and graphic arts. Blending his own Mediterranean culture with the French accents of the Centre Chorégraphic National in La Rochelle, which he’s been directing for the past ten years, Attou takes New York–born hip-hop and blends it with a host of other influences to create this new piece, which has an original sound score by Régis Ballet and Diaphane. Meet the director and the dancers at a post-curtain chat on Wednesday evening.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Sun

1/28

Dance

Kader Attou–Company Accrorap

This French-Algerian troupe of eleven male hip-hop dancers makes its U.S. debut with The Roots. Directed and choreographed by “dance smuggler” Kader Attou, it combines hip-hop with circus, contemporary dance, and graphic arts. Blending his own Mediterranean culture with the French accents of the Centre Chorégraphic National in La Rochelle, which he’s been directing for the past ten years, Attou takes New York–born hip-hop and blends it with a host of other influences to create this new piece, which has an original sound score by Régis Ballet and Diaphane. Meet the director and the dancers at a post-curtain chat on Wednesday evening.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Tue

1/30

Dance

Compagnie Hervé Koubi

What amounts to a festival of French and North African hip-hop continues in Chelsea as Compagnie Hervé Koubi performs the New York premiere of What the Day Owes to the Night. This eighteen-year-old troupe, whose members hail from Algeria and Burkina Faso, mixes highly athletic moves from capoeira, martial arts, hip-hop, and contemporary dance, performing to a score that ranges from Johann Sebastian Bach and Hamza El Din to the Kronos Quartet and traditional Sufi music. Award-winning director Koubi, of Algerian descent, grew up in the south of France, studying biology and dance en route to becoming a pharmacist, but in the 21st century tossed in his heart with dance and attended Rosella Hightower’s school in Cannes. Meet him at a post-performance chat on Wednesday evening.

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Julius Eastman and Dance: Molissa Fenley, Andy de Groat, and More

Dead-center in the three-week exploration “Julius Eastman: That Which is Fundamental” — a survey of the work of the late, great musician/composer/choreographer (1940–1990), who worked extensively with Meredith Monk — comes a one-night-only performance of Molissa Fenley’s Geologic Moments, originally developed for the Next Wave Festival in 1986. Performing to a remastered recording of a duo-piano score by Eastman with Joyce Solomon, the 2018 cast includes Fenley, Christiana Axelsen, Jared Brown, Ananda González, India González, and Peter Kyle. Also on the program: the first-ever public screening of archival footage of Andy de Groat’s 1981 GRAVY, a medicine of spaces, to Eastman’s music, along with other archival material on the tortured gay artist, who died destitute.

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Music

John Hollenbeck Large Ensemble

The big-band LSD meditation you’ve been waiting for can be found in “Long Swing Dream” from the John Hollenbeck Large Ensemble’s grand new All Can Work. The drummer-composer’s third album with his powerful twenty-piece ensemble is richly inventive, as usual, and contains longer and shorter pieces inspired by the likes of Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, Piet Mondrian’s Broadway Boogie Woogie, and the group’s late trumpeter, Laurie Frink. There’s also a high-register remake of Billy Strayhorn’s “Elf,” and a maximalist rendition of Kraftwerk’s “The Model,” which hearkens back to Hollenbeck’s earlier collection of pop covers. Tuesday’s concert, the first in a series of co-presentations with the neophilic New Amsterdam label, opens with a set by harmonically kaleidoscopic guitarist Ben Monder and vocal experimentalist Theo Bleckmann, who’ve been recording together since 1997.

Richard Gehr