Thu

8/24

Fri

8/25

Sat

8/26

Sun

8/27

Mon

8/28

Tue

8/29

Wed

8/30

Today

Thu

8/24

Comedy

Dave Chappelle

Photo: Lester Cohen

After walking away from his very successful and groundbreaking Comedy Central sketch show, which ran from 2003–2006, Dave Chappelle remained out of the spotlight. Yet the release this March of two well-received stand-up specials on Netflix, Deep in the Heart of Texas and The Age of Spin, marked his long-awaited return to television. Now the comedian known for his brash and thought-provoking humor is taking to the Radio City Music Hall stage for a fourteen-show August residency. Chappelle has enlisted several fellow comedic luminaries — among them Chris Rock, Ali Wong, and Trevor Noah — to join him onstage as special guests. The nearly month-long stand will also include musical performances from the likes of Chance the Rapper, Lauryn Hill, Childish Gambino, Lil Wayne, Yasiin Bey, Erykah Badu, and the Roots.

Amara Thomas

Music

Charlie Parker Jazz Festival

It always celebrates Bird, but the 2017 iteration of the Charlie Parker Jazz Festival should also tip the hat to itself a bit. Sustaining a quarter-century of free annual music programing is certainly a praiseworthy achievement, and this year’s program is actually fatter than usual. (Maybe the teeming lineup is trying to parallel the impact of the iconic saxophonist’s bop lingo.) From students and vets doing the With Strings material to an interview (and gig) with Parker pal Lee Konitz to a jam session, film screening, and tap dance show, choices abound both uptown and down-. The weekend concerts are especially key: Bill Saxton’s brusque beauty, Art Baron’s wily scholarship, the deep swing of drummers Louis Hayes and Terri Lyne Carrington. But don’t miss the virtuosity of Anat Cohen, and cross those fingers that the sass of Tia Fuller somehow shares onstage airspace with the blues of Lou Donaldson. As far as Josh Redman goes, well, he clocked the maestro’s “Moose the Mooche” and “Salt Peanuts” on his earliest joints years ago, so he’s always been up for a little ornithology.

—Jim Macnie

Film

Full Moon in Paris

Using the bittersweet and lighthearted “Comedies and Proverbs” series as his cover, Eric Rohmer dropped one of his bleakest works with 1984’s Full Moon in Paris. Living with her boyfriend Remi (Tchéky Karyo) in suburban Marne-la-Vallée, Louise (Pascale Ogier) confides to her married friend Octave (Fabrice Luchini) her plan to obtain a Parisian pied-à-terre to satisfy her craving for urban life. Uncharacteristically, the self-justifications of the Rohmer protagonist are signposted, and the unintended outcome of her plan is foreseen by all. Even more startlingly, Rohmer removes our access to the organizing consciousness of his central character — heretofore the linchpin of his narratives — just as the plot thickens mid-film. Does Rohmer’s conservative moralism rear its head here at last? Pascale Ogier enjoyed the film’s great success only briefly, dying of heart failure a day before her 26th birthday, two months after Full Moon’s Paris premiere.

Dan Sallitt

Fri

8/25

Nightlife

Nicky Siano’s Native New Yorker

Photo: Justin Gardner

The term disco wasn’t yet in vogue when sixteen-year-old Nicky Siano started DJ’ing in New York City clubs in 1971. A year later, with the help of his friend Robin Lord and his brother, Joe, Siano would open what many consider to be the first disco club: the Gallery. Siano went on to revolutionize the art of DJ’ing and club life in the city and the world over through his uniquely immersive experiences at the Gallery, his early DJ residency at Studio 54, and his collaborations with pop and experimental-music great Arthur Russell. Now, nearly fifty years after the birth of it all, Siano teams up with the Good Room and Miss Rebecca (of the Bowery Electric’s “Mobile Mondays”) for the latest edition of “Nicky Siano’s Native New Yorker,” a glorious throwback to the opulent, irresistible nights of Siano’s Seventies heyday. This is “always the party we put our hearts and souls into,” Siano tells the Voice.

Amelia Rina

Music

The Mattson 2

While many have noted the special harmonic convergence enjoyed by sibling singers, the genetic affinity between blood-bonded instrumentalists is somewhat harder to pin down. Southern California instrumental duo the Mattson 2, however, have exhibited an uncommon musical mind-meld since the release of their 2009 debut. Identical twins Jared (guitar) and Jonathan (drums) Mattson mostly improvise a cooler West Coast version of the post-rocking, improv-friendly Chicago Underground collective, blurring the lines between lite jazz, psychedelia, and the sort of instrumental rock that wouldn’t be out of place on the Twin Peaks soundtrack (with a sartorial style that brings to mind D.C.’s Thievery Corporation). Jared’s looping guitar lines also recall the cosmic minimalism of German groove-master Manuel Göttsching as the Mattsons extend the West Coast monozygotic precedent set by Nels and Alex Cline.

—Richard Gehr

Sat

8/26

Music

AFROPUNK

Photo: Afropunk 2016

The premier Brooklyn-based festival for Black music, fashion, film, and art has grown into a New York summer staple. Since its 2005 debut, at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, the annual event has never stopped expanding; it now takes place at Commodore Barry Park in Fort Greene, and has also spawned satellite fests of the same name in Atlanta, Paris, London, and Johannesburg. Headlining this year’s festivities is megastar Solange, a magnifying force fit to embody all that AFROPUNK stands for. (Her recent A Seat at the Table dominated charts and hearts.) Alternative r&b singer SZA, Sampha, Thundercat, Princess Nokia, Kaytranada, Raphael Saadiq, Anderson .Paak, and more are also set to grace the stages. Reflecting and propelling all manner of Black art, AFROPUNK continues to cultivate a space for Black cultures, subcultures, countercultures, and everything in between.

Ivie Ani

Music

Warm Up

Somewhere during the two-decade run of MoMA P.S.1’s summer music series, the spread of global DJ culture turned what started as an artsy experimental showcase into the best place in New York to spot Bushwick artists and Murray Hill finance bros mingling happily in beat-driven bliss. By giving programmers from New York’s music scene free rein to each create a one-day dream lineup, Warm Up has managed to stay right on the bleeding edge of every subgenre of electronic sound. Selections are a mixture of high, low, heady, and fun; artists hail from around the world and across the music spectrum.

—Zoë Beery

Beach

Riis Bazaar Beach Pass

We’re approaching the heart of summer, and if you need an added incentive to get to the beach before Labor Day, here’s a good deal that’s going on all season long. You get two beers or glasses of wine; a cheeseburger and fries or a veggie dog and fries from Ed & Bev’s; and, for an extra $7, a beach chair for a little extra-comfy lounging. Plus, the deal provides a 10 percent discount on a ticket for the Rockaway Beach Bus — an option that may be appealing given the recent hiccups surrounding the city’s new ferry service from Wall Street to Rockaway. However you get there, after a couple of drinks and a bite, you’ll certainly be ready for a dip in the refreshing ocean, which is, of course, complimentary. Check the website for information on live music and other special events.

—Mary Bakija

Parties

Jazz Age Lawn Party

Now in its twelfth year, the Jazz Age Lawn Party has been going on for about as long as the Jazz Age itself did. If you’ve never set sail for the Roaring Twenties via Governors Island, it’s time to get your act together. Don your best Gatsby-inspired getup for a weekend of Prohibition-era music, flappers, fancy cocktails, and rampant picnicking. This year’s performances include the swinging Dreamland Follies, Philadelphia’s Drew Nugent and the Midnight Society, and of course the man himself — Michael Arenella and his Dreamland Orchestra. Pick up a picnic tote with a pre-packed spread and bottle of rosé, or grab a bite at one of the gourmet food trucks. Stay all day for dance lessons, croquet, the Bathing Beauties and Beaus Promenade, and a Twenties-themed motorcar exhibition. On Sunday only, savor the High Court of Pie Contest, offering prizes for most creative and most booze-infused pie.

—Heather Baysa

Dance

MOVE(NYC) Finale Showcase

Under the direction of Nigel Campbell and Chanel DaSilva, young professional dancers are teaching and mentoring even younger dancers — a group of thirty-four talented New York City teenagers between the ages of thirteen and eighteen, recruited from every borough — in an effort to level the playing field for dancers of color. This culminating program of a free three-week intensive, at which Dance Theatre of Harlem ballerina Ingrid Silva, Abraham.in.Motion dancer Tamisha Guy, and Limón company member Jesse Obremski, among other top performers, have been teaching a variety of essential dance skills and techniques, features new choreography by Juilliard-trained Antonio Brown, Purchase grad Damani Pompey, and former Batsheva dancer Shamel Pitts. These budding artists are likely to totally burn the floor.

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Beach Sessions Dance Series 2

Choreographer Madeline Hollander has a thing for trucks and loves the beach; her new Arena fuses these passions in a minimalist work she calls a “study of dissipative structures and autopoiesis.” She brings to Rockaway a series of duets for beach-raking trucks and six dancers. First the rakes clear pathways, making a stage for the dancers, who come along and leave footprints in the freshly combed sand. Then it reverses: The trucks follow the dancers, erasing their footprints and all traces of their presence. The trucks and the dancers repeat this process until the sun goes down. This location, a new one for this series, is just three blocks from the new New York City Ferry, near the Rockaway Beach Roller Rink. Rain date is Sunday.

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Sun

8/27

Film

Children of Men

Photo: Photofest

Despite experiencing a renaissance after 9-11, dystopian science fiction has in recent movies turned out to be something of a busted flush: an epidemic of sham sobriety, ever cognizant of franchise utilization yet starved of actual design imagination. One conspicuous exception was Alfonso Cuarón’s 2006 Children of Men, an adaptation of P.D. James’s 1992 novel, which appeared like a gift near the end of a weak year for the movies. In a near-future blighted by a generation of worldwide infertility, the fate of mankind falls into the reluctant hands of a former activist (Clive Owen) who’s been conscripted to protect a miraculously pregnant woman and ferry her to safety. While there’s no shortage of meticulously composed waste and decay onscreen, it’s through the film’s relentless momentum — aided by a series of elaborate and justly celebrated long-take sequences — that Cuarón produces an atmosphere of sadness and loss: a world that’s never not moving on.

—Jaime N. Christley

Beach

Riis Bazaar Beach Pass

We’re approaching the heart of summer, and if you need an added incentive to get to the beach before Labor Day, here’s a good deal that’s going on all season long. You get two beers or glasses of wine; a cheeseburger and fries or a veggie dog and fries from Ed & Bev’s; and, for an extra $7, a beach chair for a little extra-comfy lounging. Plus, the deal provides a 10 percent discount on a ticket for the Rockaway Beach Bus — an option that may be appealing given the recent hiccups surrounding the city’s new ferry service from Wall Street to Rockaway. However you get there, after a couple of drinks and a bite, you’ll certainly be ready for a dip in the refreshing ocean, which is, of course, complimentary. Check the website for information on live music and other special events.

—Mary Bakija

Food & Drink

Kimchipalooza 7

Fermentation fiends, your time has come. This Sunday, join Brooklyn’s own Mama O’s Kimchi for the seventh annual Kimchipalooza, a celebration of Korea’s spicy pickled cabbage and other vegetables. Hosted from two to eight at Carolina barbecue specialist Arrogant Swine’s Bushwick warehouse, the event will let lovers of all things pungent sample different kinds of kimchi, try their hand at making their own batch, and watch a “super spicy kimchi eating contest.” Live music, including beats from DJ Ibe, will set the scene, and there’s a good chance you’ll want to dance after digging into special kimchi-paste-slathered ’cue from Arrogant Swine’s passionate pitmaster, Tyson Ho.

Zachary Feldman

Mon

8/28

Film

Summer Double Features

Photo: On the Bowery / Courtesy Film Forum

With temperatures sweltering, Film Forum offers solace to city denizens with over two dozen choice double features. While a number of the pairings fall under the theater’s specialty of pre-Code pleasures and auteurist complements (including Hitchcock, Ford, and Bresson), the programmers have also conjured a few clever curiosities that highlight the shifting of several specific New York City neighborhoods over time. Soho goes from drunkard’s row in the semi-documentary On the Bowery (1957) to a Kafkaesque nightmare of hipsters and punks in Martin Scorsese’s After Hours (1985). Coney Island likewise undergoes a signification transformation, beginning as a playground for the pratfalls of Harold Lloyd in Speedy (1928) and later becoming the inspiration for a child’s imagination in Little Fugitive (1953).

—Peter Labuza

Art

Anish Kapoor: Descension

Anish Kapoor, to his enormous credit, is the rare contemporary artist who begins not with concepts, but with style. Whatever ideas emerge from his art come later, from the look of the thing, the way it feels and how it hits the senses. Although Kapoor tends toward a clean, spare, graceful style, there is often something overwhelming to his work. That’s certainly the case with “Descension,” an endless whirlpool that disappears into the earth, now installed at Brooklyn Bridge Park. Much of its power comes from the tremendous and ominous hum it generates, which most people will notice before they even lay eyes on it. If there is a drawback, it’s the location: Brooklyn Bridge Park is anodyne and clean, which blunts some of Kapoor’s force. Still, the installation introduces a dose of aesthetic anxiety into any visitor’s day, which alone is commendable.

—Pac Pobric

Tue

8/29

Film

Erotic City

Photo: The Private Afternoons of Pamela Mann / Courtesy Quad Cinema

August ends with a bang thanks to the Quad, whose week-long “Erotic City” explores sex onscreen in underground films made in New York from the Sixties through the Eighties. The series offers a diverse array of riches, most of the selections filled with not just naughty bits but also auteurist flourishes. Highlights include three hardcore films from the recently departed Radley Metzger, an erotic-cinema pioneer who got his start cutting trailers for European art films and always made space in his work for a sly sense of humor and dynamic compositions. There’s also Double Agent 73 (1974), a sexploitation spy picture from one of the genre’s only female auteurs, Doris Wishman, and Bijou (1972), Wakefield Poole’s avant-garde gay fantasia. Many of the films screen in 35mm (way classier than watching porn on your laptop), and there’s even a 16mm program of experimental shorts on the 26th. Come for the delightfully decadent titles like Aroused, Naked Came the Stranger, and Red Roses of Passion, stay for the formal experimentation and tantalizing glimpses into the city’s most freewheeling days.

Abbey Bender

Theater

Dream Up Festival

Though the New York International Fringe Festival went on hiatus this year, there are a number of alternative options — including this one, the eighth annual Dream Up Festival — through which you can still get your summer fix of new musicals, plays, and solo shows at affordable prices. Watch musicians you might have seen on subway platforms sing about their underground journey in Buskers, the Musical, a documentary-inflected piece inspired by the experiences of these tireless artists. First-time director Toney Brown adapts the bizarro satirical novel A Crack Up at the Race Riots, written by the notorious Harmony Korine. Award-winning Icelandic playwright Hrafnhildur Hagalín Guðmundsdóttir’s Guilty makes its American debut, telling the sordid true tale of an 1837 criminal trial in Iceland involving a young girl who was sexually abused by her mother’s lover. If none of those sound strange enough, Dream Up also boasts shows about clowns (I.M. Lost!), God (God in a Box (OR) THE DIVINE INCARCERATION), and a robot T. rex (Sword of the Unicorn).

Nicole Serratore

Wed

8/30

Art

AIDS at Home: Art and Everyday Activism

Photo: ACT UP Rally at City Hall Park (detail), Lee Snider, 1988 / Lee Snider Photograph Collection, Fales Library & Special Collections

Pride month may be over, but there’s still plenty of time to catch the Museum of the City of New York’s current show, “AIDS at Home: Art and Everyday Activism,” which takes a new look at the disease and its politics through a domestic lens. AIDS activism often involves spectacular forms of protest, but MCNY’s exhibition explores the relatively less visible role of queer homes and support networks during the Eighties and on through the present day. Three rooms divide the show into broad themes — caretaking, housing, and family — mapping out a novel history of New York’s LGBTQ community in documents and artworks across an array of mediums, including works in yarn, embroidery, wallpaper, textiles (think: the AIDS quilt), and other household materials. Arriving during a period of great discontent in Washington — six members of the Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS recently resigned to protest the White House’s lack of a strategy for addressing the ongoing epidemic — the show couldn’t feel more urgent.

Joseph Cermatori