Tue

10/17

Wed

10/18

Thu

10/19

Fri

10/20

Sat

10/21

Sun

10/22

Mon

10/23

Today

Tue

10/17

Art

Duke Riley: Now Those Days Are Gone

Photo: “The Armies of the Night (partial view of 1,000 paintings),” 2017 / COURTESY THE ARTIST AND MAGNAN METZ GALLERY

Duke Riley’s current exhibition at Magnan Metz is a two-parter: A large temporary space across the street from the gallery displays new work, made in the wake of the artist’s Fly by Night undertaking; and in the gallery itself is a mini-retrospective of past pieces and project artifacts, including his original submarine. The show lends aesthetic grounding and context to the performance-style works, and tinges Riley’s rapscallion energy with introspection and melancholy. “The studio practice is extremely important to me functioning as a human and artist,” Riley says. “Starting with a blank piece of paper and creating another world — even when the projects are happening, it’s an important part because I’m thinking.”

Siddhartha Mitter

Film

Toute Une Nuit

Between the sleepless despair of Eric Rohmer’s Full Moon in Paris and the confrontational horniness of Catherine Breillat’s Trouble at Night dwells the sentient Brussels-after-dark of this 1982 Chantal Akerman film. Plot-resistant and largely dialogue-free, Toute Une Nuit pulses with wistful yearning; the men and women are lonely together, lonelier apart, and the children escape into the wilderness. Akerman runs through countless tiny scenarios, transforming real locations into a dream theater, in which she contrasts against the hard, aged urban surfaces a spectrum of emotional states, many fragile, all transitory. A marionette working upon an infinite diorama, Akerman renders Toute Une Nuit with the watertight credibility of someone who knows that her own depthless longing comes equipped with a universal adapter. Toute Une Nuit emerges finally as a palimpsest scroll, its naked story-prompts passing in quick succession, each leaving a stubborn after-image.

Jaime NChristley

 

Music

Tidal X Brooklyn

This star-studded show, hosted by the streaming service Tidal, will raise money to support hurricane-relief efforts in Puerto Rico. To that end, the night will feature a rare performance by Jennifer Lopez, in addition to hyped-up rising stars like the rappers Cardi B and Remy Ma, and the underground Bronx rapper Princess Nokia. This lineup represents a great cross-section of some of the most interesting rappers working today, and it’s all for a good cause.

Sophie Weiner

Music

Moving Sounds Festival

The Austrian Cultural Forum has teamed up with the forward-thinking, digitally focused curators Eyebeam and the electronic music center Ars Electronica for several days of experimental art and music. This Tuesday show features Josef Klammer, an Austrian photographer and experimental drummer whose performances investigate percussion as a concept, playing with audience expectation and with what music and composition should be. He’s joined by Paul, the avant-garde saxophone project of Bushwick arts impresario Angelina Dreem.

Sophie Weiner

Wed

10/18

Art

Brooklyn Photographs

Photo: Photograph by Patrick D. Pagnano

New Yorkers are accustomed to change, Brooklynites perhaps more than most. In the past thirty years, the borough has undergone tremendous adjustments that have brought both good and ill. Now BRIC, the nonprofit arts and media organization, presents “Brooklyn Photographs,” an exhibition of seventy-five images from the Sixties through the present day, by eleven artists and documentarians who have captured Brooklyn’s history and its makeover. The contributors include Max Kozloff (the former editor of Artforum magazine), who spent twenty years photographing the West Indian Carnival; Russell Frederick, who has tracked the gentrification of Bed-Stuy; Meryl Meisler, whose work has focused on her students at I.S.291 in Bushwick; and George Malave, who spent time with kids on Varet Street in the late Sixties. All told, the photographs offer a succinct snapshot of an enormous, diverse, and ever-changing city.

—Pac Pobric

Thu

10/19

Theater

The Power of Emotion: The Apartment

Photo: Maria Baranova

It’s one thing to talk about fiery emotions — and another to get so mad that your apartment literally catches on fire. This, among other things, is the premise for The Power of Emotion: The Apartment, a new musical play now showing at Abrons Arts Center. A collaboration between writer Shonni Enelow and director Katherine Brook, the piece explores the cultural politics of feelings — how we perform our inner states — through a true crime–inspired tale of two women and a deadly argument. (The title is an homage to Alexander Kluge’s 1983 documentary about emotion, in all its philosophical and psychological complexity.) Classical-music quintet TAK Ensemble will perform live, playing new compositions by composer Taylor Brook. There will also be tarot card readings, courtroom drama, and forays into opera and film history.

Miriam FeltonDansky

Music

Blue Hawaii

Blue Hawaii’s first release, 2010’s Blooming Summer, was wistful electronic pop that fit in well with the “blog house” bands that at that point were circulating through sites like Gorilla vs Bear. Over the last seven years, the duo of Raphaelle Standell and Alexander Kerby have evolved along with the times. Their new record, Tenderness, still boasts the evocative vocals that make Standell’s other band, Braids, so memorable, but Blue Hawaii’s new music is far more influenced by disco and house. These are songs you could play on the dance floor — as long as you’re ready to think a little while you party.

Sophie Weiner

Music

M. Lamar + Sam Mickens Sings Country + Amy Mills + Crucifix Trio

Vital Joint is an intimate Brooklyn space curated by the DIY theater company Title:Point. Though many of its events are theatrical, it also occasionally hosts concerts like this one. M. Lamar is an opera singer and performance artist whose work deals with the deep wounds of racism. Sam Mickens, who has played in groups including Xiu Xiu and Parenthetical Girls, will sing country songs in his unforgettable vibrato. It should be a fascinating night of vastly different styles.

Sophie Weiner

Music

Dead Rider

Chicago quartet Dead Rider exude the kind of oily, precarious rock you could see the Twin Peaks woodsmen getting down to – unlike that insipid electropop narcotizing the Roadhouse crowd. Led by Todd Rittmann, Dead Rider (formerly D. Rider) evolved out of U.S. Maple and Singer, bands that often sounded ambivalent about their very existence. Rider, however, is more than happy to invite you into its grand, greasy vortex. On their formidable new Crew Licks, Rittmann and friends sound like a nightmare cast dreamed up by Universal Pictures in the Forties. His guitar soars, slobbers, and sputters through decomposing blues; he plays flesh-eating duets with himself as water drips from rusty overhead pipes, while a synthesizer messes with the verticals and horizontals. Their “Ramble on Rose” cover, meanwhile, transforms the Grateful Dead into subterranean avant-r&b. This is the water and this is the well, indeed. Also: Eaters and Christina Schneider’s Genius Grant.

Richard Gehr

Fri

10/20

Theater

Mementos Mori

Photo: Drew Dir

The Grim Reaper comes a-calling in Manual Cinema’s Mementos Mori, in which the specter of Death takes the form of a femme fatale figure. The Manual Cinema collective, which hails from Chicago, is known for making “live cinema” incorporating a medley of elements: live performance, highly-detailed shadow-puppets, music and sound effects, and dynamic visuals projected on screens above the artists at work. With an eye equally invested in both the story and the creative process, their productions allow the audience a peek behind the curtain, so to speak — the puppeteers often do double duty as actors. From this vantage point, the complexity of the creators’ efforts can be thoroughly appreciated. According to a release, Death’s journey in the elaborate Mementos Mori also involves “a ghost, a seven-year-old girl, and an elderly projectionist.”

Nicole Serratore

Music

Nicolas Jaar

The electronic composer Nicolas Jaar has only two albums out, but he’s generated an outsize presence on the scene — even enough to sell out three nights at Brooklyn Steel. (The addition of this show was due to popular demand.) On his most recent release, 2016’s Sirens, Jaar displays his full range, with songs that hum quietly, drift into delicate piano samples, and then abruptly burst into gospel choirs. It’s impressive work that will easily blossom in the venue’s cavernous space.

Sophie Weiner

Music

Quiet Time

This party by promoters Quiet Time will gather some of electronic dance music’s most exploratory talents to raise money for Fondos Unidos de Puerto Rico, one of the island’s hurricane-relief ventures. Kode9, who DJs and produces music ranging from hip-hop to jungle, is an influential U.K. export. His label, Hyperdub, expertly curates artists who are pushing boundaries and creating new sounds, from Laurel Halo to Zomby. Debit, another fearless and pioneering DJ, who is part of Mexico City’s NAAFI collective, will play her abrasive, challenging sounds, while DJ J. Albert presents a live set of his contemplative breakbeats. The party takes place at an intimate secret spot with a custom sound system.

Sophie Weiner

Sat

10/21

Music

Ragas Live Festival

Photo: Courtesy Rubin Museum of Art

Columbia radio station WKCR’s annual marathon of Indian classical music has evolved into the Ragas Live Festival, a 24-hour, 24-performance immersion in India’s northern and southern classical traditions — along with some jazzy fellow travelers. You’ll want to either come early, or stay very late, to hear Indro Roy Chowdhury (sitar), Camila Celin (sarod), and Deepal Chodhari (santoor) perform seldom-heard morning ragas. You should also catch the Varanasi sitar master Rabindra Narayan Goswami and Carnatic vocalist Vignesh Ishwar. However, innovative fusion experiments like percussionist Sameer Gupta’s A Circle Has No Beginning, the string trio Woven, and Recalling the Valley (paying tribute to a landmark 1967 Hindustani recording) are what really distinguish this festival, which should resonate nicely alongside the Rubin’s immersive “The World Is Sound” exhibition.

Richard Gehr

Music

Ambient Church

Krautrock legend Hans-Joachim Roedelius will headline this edition of the Ambient Church series in south Brooklyn. Roedelius founded the groups Cluster and Harmonia in the Seventies, before branching into new age and ambient in the Nineties. He’ll play together with Steve Hauschidlt and John Elliott, both of the group Emeralds, who play bubbling, arpeggiated drone.

Sophie Weiner

Dance

Rebecca Davis

A choreographer whose work includes curation, performance, installation, and sculpture, and who practices and teaches the Feldenkrais method, Rebecca Davis here mobilizes collaborating performers Martita Abril, Dana Florin-Weiss, Carolyn Hall, and Kay Ottinger in her new quartet, the final hands count beginning sounds. One of the first artists to show work eleven years ago at this intimate Queens theater, she presents a piece in which the dancers change positions in precise, second-by-second shifts, moving between sitting, standing, kneeling, and lying flat. (They also create kinetic sculptures, within the dance, that range from minimalist to densely geometric.) Zach Layton provides the sound, and Kathy Kaufmann the lighting.

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Music

Sheer Mag

L.A.’s Sheer Mag are one of the most badass bands currently on the indie rock circuit. Need to Feel Your Love, their debut album released this year, showed off their sick guitar riffs and lead singer Tina Halladay’s raspy, dominating voice. Their overwhelming stage presence and banging Seventies-esque, hard rock–inspired tunes are catnip for anyone who likes to drink cheap beer and fling their hair.

Sophie Weiner

Sun

10/22

Film

Margaret Mead Film Festival

Photo: Brimstone and Glory / Courtesy American Museum of Natural History

The theme of this year’s Margaret Mead Film Festival — “Activate” — sounds rather apropos in a city and a country that have been battered over the past several months by the intolerance and authoritarianism of the Trump administration. Tucked away at the American Museum of Natural History, the documentary-oriented fest honors the famed anthropologist’s desire for attaining a fuller understanding of the human condition. The four-day program will include screenings, dialogues with filmmakers, parties, and a special installation (by the stop-motion-animation artist Amanda Strong). As for the movies themselves, there will be, among others, a piece about a man documenting his own impending blindness and another about an Iroquois lacrosse team fighting struggling for recognition.

—Natalia Hadjigeorgiou

Art

AIDS at Home: Art and Everyday Activism

Pride month may be over, but there’s still plenty of time to catch the Museum of the City of New York’s current show, “AIDS at Home: Art and Everyday Activism,” which takes a new look at the disease and its politics through a domestic lens. AIDS activism often involves spectacular forms of protest, but MCNY’s exhibition explores the relatively less visible role of queer homes and support networks during the Eighties and on through the present day. Three rooms divide the show into broad themes — caretaking, housing, and family — mapping out a novel history of New York’s LGBTQ community in documents and artworks across an array of mediums, including works in yarn, embroidery, wallpaper, textiles (think: the AIDS quilt), and other household materials. Arriving during a period of great discontent in Washington — six members of the Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS recently resigned to protest the White House’s lack of a strategy for addressing the ongoing epidemic — the show couldn’t feel more urgent.

Joseph Cermatori

Art

Fictions

It began with “Freestyle,” back in 2001. Since then, every few years the Studio Museum in Harlem has held a series of influential exhibitions that are specifically intended to bring a fresh crop of noteworthy Black American artists to the attention of a broad audience. An alliterative conceit binds together what have become known as the “F shows”: “Frequency” in 2005, “Flow” in 2008, “Fore” in 2012. Now, the museum has decided the climate is right to release a new batch of talent from the continual prospecting that is part of its mission. “Fictions,” featuring work by nineteen artists from around the country, and with a strong proportion of installation and work in unorthodox materials, began in September and runs through early January.

Siddhartha Mitter

Theater

Oh My Sweet Land

The writer and director Amir Nizar Zuabi’s play Oh My Sweet Land has no fixed address. Instead of being housed in a theater, it is being performed every night in the kitchen of a different New York apartment or community space. This movement around the city mirrors the plight of Syrian refugees, the subject of the piece, who have been pushed out of their homes by war and forced into a nomadic existence. The unsettled nature of the story’s characters neatly gel with its peripatetic premise: In just 65 minutes, Zuabi sends his audience across time and space, through vivid storytelling, aggressive smells and sounds, and descriptive detail — all imbued with a furious intensity that is not easily shaken.

Nicole Serratore

Music

Psychedelic Furs

The English rock band Psychedelic Furs, who started putting out music in the late Seventies and became iconic with the song “Pretty in Pink,” are both touring again and, according to band member Tim Butler, working on a new album. Their last full length was 1991’s World Outside, an expansive pop record that now feels incredibly Eighties. Now that these sounds are back in style, it’s not hard to imagine a new album from the band fitting in with the many young indie groups that emulate them.

Sophie Weiner

Mon

10/23

Film

Philippe Garrel: Part 1

Photo: L'Enfant Secret (1979)

An admirer of Murnau and von Stroheim, Philippe Garrel infuses his fiercely intimate, artisanal work with the expressivity of early silent cinema. At times, he turns off sound entirely. Not knowing what is being said heightens the spectators’ anxiety and contributes to the general sense of ambivalence that pervades Garrel films, forcing us to hang on to the actors’ fleeting facial expressions and gestures. In this way, Garrel’s oeuvre is about the body language of love, the choreography of the myriad physical manifestations of the joy but mainly the pain it inflicts.

Ela Bittencourt

Film

Three Businessmen

Alex Cox’s 1998 film establishes a brief stop in Liverpool as the stuff of slapstick so dry it almost isn’t there (except when jokes intrude like Whac-a-Mole), all while adhering to a dishwater-realist mode in photographing that town’s tourist quadrant. It’s a clash of styles that shouldn’t work — imagine sober mystic Rivette absconding with a few pages of Tati’s gag notebook. Miguel Sandoval is our first businessman, lacquered in indefatigable yet perennially exasperated good cheer, not an atypical road-warrior personality cocktail. Circumstances and a derelict hotel staff throw him in with a second businessman (played by Cox himself), transforming the largest part of the movie into a nighttime buddy comedy: Linklater’s Before Last Call. Things get pretty strange as drastic location shifts assert themselves casually, but this must be Cox’s most rigorously programmed fantasy, a Buñuelian Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas on a budget and without pharmaceutical intervention.

Jaime N. Christley