Wed

1/17

Thu

1/18

Fri

1/19

Sat

1/20

Sun

1/21

Mon

1/22

Tue

1/23

Today

Wed

1/17

Film

Margaret

Photo: Fox Searchlight/Photofest

Our rocky 2017 at least seems to have done right by Kenneth Lonergan: Oscar voters correctly gave him the Best Screenplay award in February, for Manchester by the Seaand a revival of his 2001 Off-Broadway play, Lobby Hero, is coming to the Helen Hayes Theatre in a couple of months. If you want to say the playwright-filmmaker is enjoying a run of good luck, know that it’s well earned. Margaret (2011), one of the greatest still-largely-underseen films of our era, was beset by a legal quagmire and distributor indifference. “Flawed” is the easiest moniker to hang on this ambitious New York tale, one that seems only incidentally to be about a girl’s adolescence getting turned upside down after she witnesses — and is perhaps complicit in having caused — a fatal bus accident. But nobody combines deeply felt ambition with rigorous intelligence like Lonergan, and Margaret emerges as a searing, truthful, and unpredictable epic. Absolutely essential.

Jaime NChristley

Dance

Angela Goh

Australian dancer-choreographer Angela Goh, long a participant in the vanguard of experimental dance work across four continents, celebrates the re-opening of PS122 with a challenge: fight rot with rot, keep on decomposing, and “creep towards a fragile future by casting old fears as productive forces.” She claims to make work for “telepathic spaces,” and her 2016 solo Desert Body Creep, making its U.S. premiere, explores transformation through a fantasy of decay, “more like a zombie than a phoenix,” according to the good folks at the Coil Festival. A beautiful young girl is swallowed whole by a giant worm in the desert. Are you ready?

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Astana Ballet Theater

Kazakhstan’s national ballet company, last seen here two years ago, offers a free concert (tickets distributed starting at six on performance night: first-come, first-served), as part of a new initiative, “Modern Kazakhstan Culture in the Global World.” Contrasting scenes of popular ballets and cultural divertissements include three main works, Heritage of the Great Steppe (shot through with folk traditions), Love Fear Loss (set to Edith Piaf songs, inspired by her life, and choreographed by Ricardo Amarante), and A Fuego Lento (a steamy exploration of the force of first love, also choreographed by Amarante, to music by Lalo Shifrin, Astor Piazzola, and Carlos Gardel). The troupe has toured widely, and has also been invited to perform at the “Stars of the White Nights” festival in St. Petersburg.

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Malpaso Dance Company

The Joyce has taken this ten-member, five-year-old Cuban contemporary dance troupe, whose name means something like misstep, under its wing, which has led to the commissioning of new works by several North American choreographers. Malpaso’s winter season includes the New York premiere of Aszure Barton’s Indomitable Waltz, to music by Alexander Balanescu, Michael Nyman, and Nils Frahm, as well as Face the Torrent, a new dance by Emmy nominee Sonya Tayeh, and a 2013 piece, Ocaso, by the troupe’s artistic director and resident choreographer, Osnel Delgado.

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Music

Keyon Harrold and Friends

When it came to the longtime camaraderie between jazz, hip-hop, and r&b in the year 2017, there wasn’t a realer, clearer vision of that unbreakable bond than The Mugician by Keyon Harrold, the man Don Cheadle called to play the trumpet parts for the actor’s acclaimed performance as Miles Davis in Miles Ahead. For his second album and Legacy Recordings debut, the Ferguson, Missouri–born man with the horn utilizes the time he’s spent recording and touring with the likes of Jay-Z, Beyoncé, David Sanborn, Mary J. Blige, Rihanna, Erykah Badu, Lauryn Hill, Andraé Crouch, Gregory Porter, Maxwell, and so many others into one of the most fluid fusions of this sonic trinity in recent memory. Only a talent like Keyon could come up with music that provides a perfect home for the microphone fiendishness of Big K.R.I.T. and Pharoahe Monch, the blues guitar lightning of Gary Clark Jr., and the golden toasting of current Wailers frontman Josh David Barrett. So when you regard the “and Friends” tease in anticipation of his four-night stand at the Blue Note, keep in mind that it can literally be anyone jumping on that stage to join him and his core band — especially considering that these shows are going down during the final nights of the Winter Jazzfest.

Ron Hart

Music

Deerhoof + Wadada Leo Smith

Nine years after their first, and only, performance together, the impressively enduring and ever-changing Bay Area art-rock quartet Deerhoof will again improvise alongside late-game “it” trumpeter Wadada Leo Smith. Incited by singer-bassist Satomi Matsuzaki and drummer Greg Saunier, Deerhoof race through fifteen nearly melodic miniatures on their most recent album, Mountain Moves. Seventy-six-year-old Smith, meanwhile, has been on a remarkable creative tear the past few years with an album of solo trumpet meditations on Thelonious Monk; an album of long-form, guitar-centric homages to John Coltrane, Ornette Coleman, and Billie Holiday; and a Pulitzer-nominated suite inspired by America’s national parks. While the closing event of this year’s NYC Winter Jazzfest will likely emanate from creative spontaneity, the tributaries informing the rockers and the trumpeter are deep, wide, and varied.

Richard Gehr

Thu

1/18

Film

Memories of Underdevelopment

Photo: Courtesy Film Forum

Cuban director Tomas Gutierrez Alea’s Memories of Underdevelopment, from 1968, is one of the greatest pictures ever made, and it’s screening in a new restoration at Film Forum that you shouldn’t miss. Don’t be surprised, however, if what you’re watching doesn’t always look brand new, or slick, or clean. Though fictional, Alea’s film mixes a variety of forms, incorporating both documentary footage shot by the director on the streets of Havana as well as archival historical images. As such, it’s also often purposefully grainy, washed out, imperfect. Alternating between immediacy and reflection, fantasy and honesty, lyricism and horror, Memories of Underdevelopment feels like it’s being created before our very eyes.

Bilge Ebiri

Music

Yams Day

This week, the chart-dominating collective A$AP Mob will come together for the third Yams Day, a commemoration of the late producer A$AP Yams, whose unique productions pushed the group into the spotlight. For this celebration, most of the Mob’s stars will be in the room, including A$AP Ferg, whose recent hit “Plain Jane” is inescapable, and Lil Yachty, the ebullient rapper with a singsong cadence and off-kilter productions. The money raised at the event will go to the Always Strive and Prosper Foundation, a charity founded by Yams’s mother, Tatianna Paulino, to “[provide] young people with accessible and realistic education about substance use and abuse.”

Sophie Weiner

Dance

Split Bill at Triskelion

On a quiet corner in Greenpoint, this useful incubator space, which opens onto convivial courtyards, offers four troupes showing new, long-form pieces, spread over four nights with each ensemble performing twice. On opening night, Falcon Dance presents a work in progress exploring the migration patterns of birds, and shares the program with Kizuna Dance, a Japanese-inflected project directed by Cameron McKinney, premiering his new Koibito, inspired by the plight of Japanese salarymen and deploying street dance and contemporary floor work. The second bill spotlights Falcon and Jessica Reidy’s Treeline Dance Works, a performance co-op, in Lift. On Saturday, the Achievements present Vital Signs, featuring Renee Gerardo and Jenny Pommiss, and share the bill with Treeline; on Sunday Kizuna and the Achievements reprise their projects.

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Music

Jenny Scheinman’s Mischief & Mayhem

Angels and demons frolic about like old pals in Jenny Scheinman’s Mischief & Mayhem, an infectiously inventive and witty quartet led by the soulful California violinist. Long the mistress of a peculiar vein of cosmopolitan Americana, Scheinman explores more combustible environs with Wilco stunt guitarist Nels Cline, the constantly surprising drummer Jim Black, and nimble bassist Todd Sickafoose — longtime associates and frequent collaborators with deep West Coast roots of their own. Scheinman, an emotionally rich font of improvisation, channels dark folk undercurrents, hot-club jazz, and anything else floating through the room. As heard on the foursome’s eponymous 2012 release, elliptic grooves and barely restrained caterwaul duke it out in tunes like “Blues for the Double Vee,” start-stop rocker “The Mite,” and ethnomusicologically playful “Ali Farka Touché.”

Richard Gehr

Music

Big Eyes

Big Eyes began in 2009, as then-21-year-old New Yorker Kait Eldridge began channeling her young-adult rages, hopes, and fears into songs that were sometimes punk, sometimes pop, and often in between. Nearly ten years later, Eldridge and her three bandmates are still releasing garage-pop songs that are often reminiscent of Dum Dum Girls or their inspiration, the Ramones, in their balance of sweetness and a harder rock edge.

Sophie Weiner

Dance

Malpaso Dance Company

The Joyce has taken this ten-member, five-year-old Cuban contemporary dance troupe, whose name means something like misstep, under its wing, which has led to the commissioning of new works by several North American choreographers. Malpaso’s winter season includes the New York premiere of Aszure Barton’s Indomitable Waltz, to music by Alexander Balanescu, Michael Nyman, and Nils Frahm, as well as Face the Torrent, a new dance by Emmy nominee Sonya Tayeh, and a 2013 piece, Ocaso, by the troupe’s artistic director and resident choreographer, Osnel Delgado.

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Music

Keyon Harrold and Friends

When it came to the longtime camaraderie between jazz, hip-hop, and r&b in the year 2017, there wasn’t a realer, clearer vision of that unbreakable bond than The Mugician by Keyon Harrold, the man Don Cheadle called to play the trumpet parts for the actor’s acclaimed performance as Miles Davis in Miles Ahead. For his second album and Legacy Recordings debut, the Ferguson, Missouri–born man with the horn utilizes the time he’s spent recording and touring with the likes of Jay-Z, Beyoncé, David Sanborn, Mary J. Blige, Rihanna, Erykah Badu, Lauryn Hill, Andraé Crouch, Gregory Porter, Maxwell, and so many others into one of the most fluid fusions of this sonic trinity in recent memory. Only a talent like Keyon could come up with music that provides a perfect home for the microphone fiendishness of Big K.R.I.T. and Pharoahe Monch, the blues guitar lightning of Gary Clark Jr., and the golden toasting of current Wailers frontman Josh David Barrett. So when you regard the “and Friends” tease in anticipation of his four-night stand at the Blue Note, keep in mind that it can literally be anyone jumping on that stage to join him and his core band — especially considering that these shows are going down during the final nights of the Winter Jazzfest.

Ron Hart

Music

Bound 1-Year Anniversary

Many of New York’s finest dance-music DJs will play at the subterranean Bushwick club Tilt this Thursday to celebrate the first anniversary of Bound, a queer, kink-centric party founded by Brooklyn techno DJ Katie Rex. The DJs span electronic genres from dancehall to house to disco; the Facebook event description announces that “fetish attire & queerness” will be enforced at the door, so if you have no interest in the kink scene, this probably isn’t the party for you. But for queer techno fans, this is by far the best option for your Thursday night.

Sophie Weiner

 

Fri

1/19

Music

Jenny Scheinman’s Mischief & Mayhem

Photo: Benjamin Lozovsky

Angels and demons frolic about like old pals in Jenny Scheinman’s Mischief & Mayhem, an infectiously inventive and witty quartet led by the soulful California violinist. Long the mistress of a peculiar vein of cosmopolitan Americana, Scheinman explores more combustible environs with Wilco stunt guitarist Nels Cline, the constantly surprising drummer Jim Black, and nimble bassist Todd Sickafoose — longtime associates and frequent collaborators with deep West Coast roots of their own. Scheinman, an emotionally rich font of improvisation, channels dark folk undercurrents, hot-club jazz, and anything else floating through the room. As heard on the foursome’s eponymous 2012 release, elliptic grooves and barely restrained caterwaul duke it out in tunes like “Blues for the Double Vee,” start-stop rocker “The Mite,” and ethnomusicologically playful “Ali Farka Touché.”

Richard Gehr

Music

Julius Eastman: That Which Is Fundamental

Julian Eastman, who died sick and homeless in 1990 at age 49, has been enjoying a remarkable second act for the past couple of years. “Julius Eastman: That Which Is Fundamental” celebrates the gay African-American composer’s short, fierce career with a multidisciplinary assault that begins Friday, January 19, with artist-composer Jeremy Toussaint-Baptiste’s Evil Nigger. The five-part work begins with a messy mockery of blackface and concludes 24 hours later with a ceremonial evocation of Eastman as quintessential trickster. Eastman’s minimalistic music will not be neglected, of course: On January 25, the S.E.M. Ensemble, with whom he toured, will perform Femenine for chamber orchestra and Joy Boy for four treble instruments. Other performances will follow until the series concludes February 3 with the American Contemporary Music Ensemble’s rendition of The Holy Presence of Joan d’Arc for ten cellos.

Richard Gehr

Dance

Split Bill at Triskelion

On a quiet corner in Greenpoint, this useful incubator space, which opens onto convivial courtyards, offers four troupes showing new, long-form pieces, spread over four nights with each ensemble performing twice. On opening night, Falcon Dance presents a work in progress exploring the migration patterns of birds, and shares the program with Kizuna Dance, a Japanese-inflected project directed by Cameron McKinney, premiering his new Koibito, inspired by the plight of Japanese salarymen and deploying street dance and contemporary floor work. The second bill spotlights Falcon and Jessica Reidy’s Treeline Dance Works, a performance co-op, in Lift. On Saturday, the Achievements present Vital Signs, featuring Renee Gerardo and Jenny Pommiss, and share the bill with Treeline; on Sunday Kizuna and the Achievements reprise their projects.

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Malpaso Dance Company

The Joyce has taken this ten-member, five-year-old Cuban contemporary dance troupe, whose name means something like misstep, under its wing, which has led to the commissioning of new works by several North American choreographers. Malpaso’s winter season includes the New York premiere of Aszure Barton’s Indomitable Waltz, to music by Alexander Balanescu, Michael Nyman, and Nils Frahm, as well as Face the Torrent, a new dance by Emmy nominee Sonya Tayeh, and a 2013 piece, Ocaso, by the troupe’s artistic director and resident choreographer, Osnel Delgado.

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Julian Barnett

NYU grad Julian Barnett, who now teaches at Middlebury College in Vermont, presents his new Subject to Change, which “excavates the dances that exist in our dreams.” Exploring the deeper currents of a mid-career artist’s motivations and values, it’s sure to manifest the diverse interests of his wide-ranging consciousness, which investigates the sociopolitical possibilities for transformation and empathy through “lenses of choreography, philosophy, musicology, science, visual art and the supernatural.” (On Sunday at 7, the space hosts an evening of developing work, with wine and a post-show discussion, featuring dances by Alexandria Giroux, AR Movement Design, Bethany Logan, Bom Diggs, Jordyn Kahler, and Lianna E. King.)

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Music

Derrick May + Jeff Derringer + DatKat + nthng

This lineup of serious techno producers and DJs at Elsewhere combines longtime favorites with lesser-known talents. The roster leads with the heavyweights, among them the originator of techno, Detroit DJ Derrick May, alongside Jeff Derringer, a resident at Chicago’s Smart Bar and founder of the underground party Oktave, who plays crisp, big room tunes. They’re backed up by artists like the mysterious Dutch ambient techno performer nthng and Analog Soul veteran DatKat. The event will take over all of Elsewhere’s space, so make sure to wander the rooms and hear everything on offer.

Sophie Weiner

Sat

1/20

Film

Punch-Drunk Love

Photo: PHOTOFEST

A match made in PR heaven, Punch-Drunk Love brings together Hollywood’s most doggedly lowbrow young comic and its most fearlessly grandiose young director; the proponent of arrested development meets the professional enfant terrible. This avant-garde studio production is predicated on the mild disconnect of vulgarian Adam Sandler playing the “Adam Sandler character” in a concept created by the wildly ambitious Paul Thomas Anderson. What’s more, the movie is a romantic comedy. Anderson’s three previous features (Hard EightBoogie Nights, and Magnolia) are all characterized by a distinctive loser’s-lounge atmosphere. Punch-Drunk Love attempts to let some sunshine in, if barely —Anderson’s fans won’t be too surprised to learn that the mood is still a bit dark.

JHoberman

Dance

Malpaso Dance Company

The Joyce has taken this ten-member, five-year-old Cuban contemporary dance troupe, whose name means something like misstep, under its wing, which has led to the commissioning of new works by several North American choreographers. Malpaso’s winter season includes the New York premiere of Aszure Barton’s Indomitable Waltz, to music by Alexander Balanescu, Michael Nyman, and Nils Frahm, as well as Face the Torrent, a new dance by Emmy nominee Sonya Tayeh, and a 2013 piece, Ocaso, by the troupe’s artistic director and resident choreographer, Osnel Delgado.

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Dances by Very Young Choreographers

Ballet classes for kids are a dime a dozen, but finding really good training in contemporary dance — how to think, as well as how to move — for young students is a challenge. Ellen Robbins is one of the rare people who do this well, and every winter she stages programs of her charges’ choreography. This week, in addition to three concerts by her current students, she’s offering an evening of work by people who’ve studied with her, as far back as 1989, and are still working in the modern-dance field. On the bill for that Friday-night alumni show are Chanda Cragnotti, Morgana Cragnotti, Lina Dahbour, Adriane Erdos, Krista Jansen, Emma Lee, Leah Newman, Amelia Sanders, Anna Sperber, and Lucy Weisner.

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Split Bill at Triskelion

On a quiet corner in Greenpoint, this useful incubator space, which opens onto convivial courtyards, offers four troupes showing new, long-form pieces, spread over four nights with each ensemble performing twice. On opening night, Falcon Dance presents a work in progress exploring the migration patterns of birds, and shares the program with Kizuna Dance, a Japanese-inflected project directed by Cameron McKinney, premiering his new Koibito, inspired by the plight of Japanese salarymen and deploying street dance and contemporary floor work. The second bill spotlights Falcon and Jessica Reidy’s Treeline Dance Works, a performance co-op, in Lift. On Saturday, the Achievements present Vital Signs, featuring Renee Gerardo and Jenny Pommiss, and share the bill with Treeline; on Sunday Kizuna and the Achievements reprise their projects.

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Music

Jenny Scheinman’s Mischief & Mayhem

Angels and demons frolic about like old pals in Jenny Scheinman’s Mischief & Mayhem, an infectiously inventive and witty quartet led by the soulful California violinist. Long the mistress of a peculiar vein of cosmopolitan Americana, Scheinman explores more combustible environs with Wilco stunt guitarist Nels Cline, the constantly surprising drummer Jim Black, and nimble bassist Todd Sickafoose — longtime associates and frequent collaborators with deep West Coast roots of their own. Scheinman, an emotionally rich font of improvisation, channels dark folk undercurrents, hot-club jazz, and anything else floating through the room. As heard on the foursome’s eponymous 2012 release, elliptic grooves and barely restrained caterwaul duke it out in tunes like “Blues for the Double Vee,” start-stop rocker “The Mite,” and ethnomusicologically playful “Ali Farka Touché.”

Richard Gehr

Dance

Julian Barnett

NYU grad Julian Barnett, who now teaches at Middlebury College in Vermont, presents his new Subject to Change, which “excavates the dances that exist in our dreams.” Exploring the deeper currents of a mid-career artist’s motivations and values, it’s sure to manifest the diverse interests of his wide-ranging consciousness, which investigates the sociopolitical possibilities for transformation and empathy through “lenses of choreography, philosophy, musicology, science, visual art and the supernatural.” (On Sunday at 7, the space hosts an evening of developing work, with wine and a post-show discussion, featuring dances by Alexandria Giroux, AR Movement Design, Bethany Logan, Bom Diggs, Jordyn Kahler, and Lianna E. King.)

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Sun

1/21

Dance

Malpaso Dance Company

Photo: Judy Ondrey

The Joyce has taken this ten-member, five-year-old Cuban contemporary dance troupe, whose name means something like misstep, under its wing, which has led to the commissioning of new works by several North American choreographers. Malpaso’s winter season includes the New York premiere of Aszure Barton’s Indomitable Waltz, to music by Alexander Balanescu, Michael Nyman, and Nils Frahm, as well as Face the Torrent, a new dance by Emmy nominee Sonya Tayeh, and a 2013 piece, Ocaso, by the troupe’s artistic director and resident choreographer, Osnel Delgado.

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Dances by Very Young Choreographers

Ballet classes for kids are a dime a dozen, but finding really good training in contemporary dance — how to think, as well as how to move — for young students is a challenge. Ellen Robbins is one of the rare people who do this well, and every winter she stages programs of her charges’ choreography. This week, in addition to three concerts by her current students, she’s offering an evening of work by people who’ve studied with her, as far back as 1989, and are still working in the modern-dance field. On the bill for that Friday-night alumni show are Chanda Cragnotti, Morgana Cragnotti, Lina Dahbour, Adriane Erdos, Krista Jansen, Emma Lee, Leah Newman, Amelia Sanders, Anna Sperber, and Lucy Weisner.

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Dance

Split Bill at Triskelion

On a quiet corner in Greenpoint, this useful incubator space, which opens onto convivial courtyards, offers four troupes showing new, long-form pieces, spread over four nights with each ensemble performing twice. On opening night, Falcon Dance presents a work in progress exploring the migration patterns of birds, and shares the program with Kizuna Dance, a Japanese-inflected project directed by Cameron McKinney, premiering his new Koibito, inspired by the plight of Japanese salarymen and deploying street dance and contemporary floor work. The second bill spotlights Falcon and Jessica Reidy’s Treeline Dance Works, a performance co-op, in Lift. On Saturday, the Achievements present Vital Signs, featuring Renee Gerardo and Jenny Pommiss, and share the bill with Treeline; on Sunday Kizuna and the Achievements reprise their projects.

—Elizabeth Zimmer

Mon

1/22

Film

Fashion in Film

Photo: Zoolander (2001) / Courtesy Paramount

The fashion industry, simultaneously glamorous and cutthroat, naturally lends itself to onscreen intrigue: There’s a distinct pleasure to be had in watching characters wear opulent costumes we wouldn’t dare try on ourselves in real life. Phantom Thread, Paul Thomas Anderson’s emotionally prickly tale of a mid-century London couturier, has emerged as the most recent arrival in the cinema’s pantheon of fashion-world allure. With the movie now playing at Brooklyn’s Alamo Drafthouse in glorious 70mm, staff programmer Cristina Cacioppo has assembled a characteristically playful companion lineup of nine other films that also represent the vast potential of fabulous outfits to captivate audiences. (The series began earlier this month and continues through the end of January.)

Abbey Bender