Sat

6/23

Sun

6/24

Mon

6/25

Tue

6/26

Wed

6/27

Thu

6/28

Fri

6/29

Today

Sat

6/23

Art

Maren Hassinger: Monuments

Photo: Maren Hassinger, “Study for Monuments,” 2018 (detail) / COURTESY THE ARTIST

Starting in June, the Studio Museum in Harlem presents “Maren Hassinger: Monuments,” which includes eight new sculptures, in Marcus Garvey Park, by the artist, who has a long association with the museum (she was an artist-in-residence in 1984). Similar to some of her previous works, the new sculptures will be made from tree branches that Hassinger found around the city, and which will be fashioned into objects, with help from New York high school students, just prior to when the exhibit opens. This sort of civic engagement has long been on the artist’s mind. In 2015, during a retrospective of her work in Atlanta, she said she wanted to get back to the ideals of the civil rights movement, and “to concentrate on issues and environments where we all have a common interest.” What better place to do that than in a New York City public park?

—Pac Pobric

Film

At the Edge of Russia

The intimacy that develops amid desolation is at the heart of Polish director Michal Marczak’s At the Edge of Russia (2010), a mesmerizing look at life in a tiny, ramshackle military encampment along the country’s snowbound Arctic border. There, a fresh-faced young recruit is trained to survive in the freezing weather — at one point, he has to spend two nights inside a hole in the ice — while also encouraged to bond with the older soldiers around him. These rough men still carry vestiges of their culture within them: They sing folk tunes, quote Lermontov and Lope de Vega poems, and joke around affectionately. But madness and violence are not far. Late in the film, one officer begins to ruminate on his wife’s infidelity, and what he intends to do to her when he returns.

Bilge Ebiri

Pride

Pride Island

Pier 97 in Hell’s Kitchen will transform into a “central hub” for the city’s Pride Week festivities, including a two-day music festival, “Pride Island,” featuring artists from various genres. The Sunday concert, headlined by Kylie Minogue, has already sold out, but tickets are still available for Saturday’s show, which will feature Swedish pop artist Tove Lo (of “Habits” fame) and the fantastic Minnesota alt-hip-hop artist Lizzo, known for her sex-positive jams.

—Jake Bittle

Dance

Mark Morris: Beginner Salsa

The redoubtable choreographer displays his precious resources in two boroughs this summer, offering free events at both his own Brooklyn facility and Lincoln Center, and an expensive one during August’s Mostly Mozart festival. This Saturday, show up at 3 Lafayette Avenue in Brooklyn at 5 p.m. for a free open-level Salsa class, taught by Bethina Flores, followed by a dance party with refreshments and live music by the Malec Heermans Latin Group. All that and you’ll be home before dark.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Comedy

Hannah Gadsby: Nanette

After a successful run of shows earlier this spring, Australian comedian Hannah Gadsby is back with her explosive stand-up special Nanette — the winner of the Edinburgh Comedy Award at that city’s famous Fringe Festival in 2017 — just in time for Pride Week. Nanette finds Gadsby, who is gay, reorienting our view of who gets to be angry onstage and make people uncomfortable; who gets to dish it, and who has to sit there and take it. The special is very funny, but it almost feels inaccurate to call it a comedy show. It’s more like a humorous treatise on comedy and how it can normalize the status quo. Nanette was released on Netflix on June 19, but don’t miss your chance to see this powerfully compelling show live.

—Lara Zarum

Film

En el Séptimo Día

Jim McKay’s En el Séptimo Día concerns José (Fernando Cardona), the star player on a nine-a-side team of mostly undocumented workers from Puebla, Mexico. José is grasping at a sporting glory rather more muted than what will be on display at the World Cup, but which is, nevertheless, a profound source of pleasure, achievement, and grace — the high point of a week otherwise spent biking across Brooklyn, delivering paper-in-plastic takeout bags filled with upscale Mexican food. But, suddenly, a dilemma: The league’s championship game is approaching the following Sunday, José’s usual day of rest, and his boss is demanding everyone show up for an important private party. Over the weekend-to-weekend timeline of the film, José weighs his responsibilities at work and to his friends and teammates.

—Mark Asch

Comedy

The Exposed Bone Workshop

Yes, the title is a mouthful. But Charles O’Leary’s fleet, funny satire The Exposed Bone Workshop Collective Ensemble Studio “Not Just Your Average Theatre Company” Theatre Company Presents: “When Pigs Fly!” A Reading Series of Hot & Spicy New American Plays Written by the Artistic Director adeptly thumbs the now even if that now has become then by the time you’ve read through the play’s name. Presented as a season of staged readings of new plays by a troubled theater company’s vainglorious doof of an a.d., The Exposed Bone uproariously lampoons that most lampoonable of figures: the straight white dude writer (Max Reinhardsen) who just can’t comprehend anyone else’s experience — or how the world has changed. A diverse cast at first embodies and then contests his clueless new dramas and musicals, with Natalie Rich quite literally stopping the show with a for-the-ages (and of-the-moment) expression of deadpan disgust. Afterwards, you’ll likely be humming the inspirational song, crooned by Diane Chen, about how nice it would be to get out of acting and work at HowlRound.

Alan Scherstuhl

Sun

6/24

Film

The Invisible Man

Photo: Photofest

Hollywood special effects peaked in the Thirties — when the waning otherworldliness of celluloid synthesized perfectly with the torrential rollout of innovative practical and optical illusions — and few directors of that era could make you doubt your own mind like James Whale. His 1933 film of The Invisible Man, brisk as a cold morning walk, all but vibrates with macabre delight, as R.C. Sherriff’s script inflates H.G. Wells’s troubled scientist first into a mischief-maker, then later into a mass murderer and arsonist. You won’t know if you’re falling up the stairs or tipping into a ravine. But the film shrewdly front-loads the main event: Claude Rains cackling as he strips off his bandages to reveal a double void of corporeality and scruples. The uncanny hybrid of wonder and gravity of the ageless visual trickery binds us to Griffin, even when our subsequent complicity makes us feel a little sick.

—Jaime N. Christley

Film

Blood

In 2013’s Blood, directed by Alina Rudnitskaya — one of the great documentarians of our time, and a director with four remarkable films in this retrospective — we follow a group of female nurses as they travel through Russia’s northwestern reaches, drawing blood from townspeople, many of whom make these donations simply to earn a few much-needed rubles. Blood is a film of literal collapse: Over and over again, the donors — malnourished, impoverished, ill — faint as their blood is withdrawn. These communities, such as they are, seem to be at the end of their rope. By contrast, the nurses themselves remain close; Rudnitskaya regularly shows them cutting loose at night. As they travel through a country that seems ever more forbidding and unforgiving, their own sense of belonging becomes stronger.

Bilge Ebiri

Film

The Mother

In Antoine Cattin and Pavel Kostomarov’s 2007 documentary, a middle-aged dairy worker, fleeing abuse, desperately tries to hold her family of nine together in the forsaken Russian countryside. Faced with poverty and rejection at every turn, and saddled with children who are starving, Lyuba is a figure of both resolute dignity and stark honesty: She speaks of the dreams she once had, and of how all her other ambitions were dashed over the years. And yet she demonstrates a strange optimism, an articulate, reflective self-knowledge. At times, we might even mistake her for a metaphor for the country itself — but that would be unfair to the specificity and urgency of her portrayal. She is, sadly, all too real.

Bilge Ebiri

Film

Chained for Life

Aaron Schimberg’s Chained for Life bears all the usual hallmarks of a New York indie of the post–Kim’s Video era: sumptuous 16mm cinematography, razor-sharp script, extravagant opening titles. But don’t be deceived: The sensibility is strictly sui generis. Chained for Life begins as ripe movie-business satire in the tradition of The Player, though with “sophisticated” international art-house fare as its target rather than Hollywood backlots. A snide, much-deferred-to foreign auteur (Charlie Korsmo) mounting his American debut wants to find his (dubious) idea of beauty in his (offensive) idea of ugly, which of course entails variously insulting, patronizing, and condescending behavior toward his largely disabled cast of hospital-bound “freaks.” Chief among them is Rosenthal (Under the Skin’s Adam Pearson), whose efforts to remain professional among co-stars Mabel (Jess Weixler) and Max (The Mend’s Stephen Plunkett, hilarious) is the heart of the film.

Calum Marsh

Pride

Pride Week Satanic Bingo

If you’ve never heard of Satanic Bingo, you’re welcome: It’s a regular event in Bushwick that combines bingo, typically seen as a more sedate activity, with raucous sideshows, burlesque performances, and tarot readings. The organizers are upping the ante in honor of Pride Week with an especially eccentric show; a bevy of prizes including paddles and wax will be on offer for bingo winners.

—Jake Bittle

Performance

Becca Blackwell: They, Themself and Schmerm

Back in February, the trans writer and performer Becca Blackwell brought their one-person show They, Themself and Schmerm to Joe’s Pub, where it promptly sold out and earned enthusiastic notices for its melding of forms (memoir-ish stand-up, audience-participation segments) and its frank unpacking of gender fluidity. In a 2012 interview with the Voice, Blackwell remarked, of their experience of being a performance artist in New York, “As someone who doesn’t fit into a binary of male or female it can be very frustrating because most work is based in those two categories only.” Six years on, Blackwell’s wrestlings with these matters are still just as politically urgent and comedically lively. (“I’m trans,” they say in one segment posted to YouTube, “but I’ll let you figure out which one.”) So after a week of outdoor-heavy Pride events, cozy up in the confines of Joe’s Pub, where two encore performances of They, Themself and Schmerm await audiences.

—Danny King

Theater

Othello

It is surprising that Othello has not been staged at the Delacorte Theater in Central Park since 1991. As well as being among Shakespeare’s most accessible works — thanks to its unswerving plot and characters — Othello presents an impending tragedy that begins, ends, and otherwise almost entirely transpires during the nighttime. So this play is an appropriate one to show outdoors during the summer: As twilight fades into evening darkness, the twittering birds grow silent and the 400-year-old story of malign intentions and misguided jealousy becomes ever more compelling.

Michael Sommers

Mon

6/25

Film

Leave No Trace

Photo: Bleecker Street

Earlier this year, Debra Granik returned to Sundance with Leave No Trace, another movie (like Granik’s Winter’s Bone) focusing on the experiences of a young woman living on the margins of society — this time, a thirteen-year-old trying to survive in the woods with her father. It might not have the genre elements that helped make Winter’s Bone a breakout, but Leave No Trace rivets in its own way. Right from the early scenes, we can feel the delicate power of Granik’s visual storytelling: As we see the propane tanks and apple boxes and shelves and tarps that father and daughter (played by the intense and excellent Ben Foster and the staggeringly good Kiwi actress Thomasin McKenzie, respectively) have gathered, we don’t need to be told that these two are not just out camping; they live in the woods. And just like that, we’re enveloped in the perplexing drama of surviving on the edge.

Bilge Ebiri

Film

Ganja & Hess

When Bill Gunn’s experimental horror feature Ganja & Hess (1973) premiered at Cannes, it received a standing ovation and the critics’ choice prize, but when it came to releasing the film, its green producers, who’d commissioned Gunn to make a “black vampire” movie à la Blacula, balked. It wasn’t the exploitation film they thought they’d be getting from the accomplished playwright and actor, despite a story about a prominent anthropologist, Dr. Hess Green (Duane Jones), who gets stabbed by his crazed assistant George Meda (Gunn), becomes immortal, then falls in love with the assistant’s wife, Ganja (Marlene Clark). Instead, it was a fever dream of monologues, African song and mythology, and meandering uncut scenes about personal pain and suicide. After Cannes, the film was recut from 110 minutes to a slim 76 and retitled Blood Couple; the director’s name was removed at his request. The Museum of Modern Art, luckily, was given an original cut of the film, and from this original, Kino Lorber has restored Gunn’s vision in all its bizarre glory.

April Wolfe

Tue

6/26

Performance

Becca Blackwell: They, Themself and Schmerm

Photo: Allison Michael Orenstein

Back in February, the trans writer and performer Becca Blackwell brought their one-person show They, Themself and Schmerm to Joe’s Pub, where it promptly sold out and earned enthusiastic notices for its melding of forms (memoir-ish stand-up, audience-participation segments) and its frank unpacking of gender fluidity. In a 2012 interview with the Voice, Blackwell remarked, of their experience of being a performance artist in New York, “As someone who doesn’t fit into a binary of male or female it can be very frustrating because most work is based in those two categories only.” Six years on, Blackwell’s wrestlings with these matters are still just as politically urgent and comedically lively. (“I’m trans,” they say in one segment posted to YouTube, “but I’ll let you figure out which one.”) So after a week of outdoor-heavy Pride events, cozy up in the confines of Joe’s Pub, where two encore performances of They, Themself and Schmerm await audiences.

—Danny King

Art

Through a Different Lens: Stanley Kubrick Photographs

Between 1945 (when he was only seventeen!) and 1950, Stanley Kubrick was first a contributor to, then an apprentice at, and finally staff photographer for Look magazine, a scrappier variant of Life. Kubrick’s first photo for them was of a dejected newspaper vendor surrounded by headlines about FDR’s death; it was staged, the subject asked to look more depressed than he was. Presented in linear order, the exhibit “Through a Different Lens: Stanley Kubrick Photographs” — on display through October at the Museum of the City of New York — tracks Kubrick from mere technical precociousness to the development of a distinct Weegee-inflected, noir-oriented style that led directly to Fear and DesireKiller’s Kiss, and The Killing, and whose increasingly obvious compositional principles and eccentricities informed everything to come after.

Vadim Rizov

Comedy

W. Kamau Bell: Private School Negro

If you literally cannot bring yourself to turn on CNN these days but still crave your dose of W. Kamau Bell, fear not: Netflix has a new standup special from the comic and host of United Shades of America, out Tuesday.

Village Voice staff

Wed

6/27

Comedy

Hannah Gadsby: Nanette

Photo: Carol Rosegg

After a successful run of shows earlier this spring, Australian comedian Hannah Gadsby is back with her explosive stand-up special Nanette — the winner of the Edinburgh Comedy Award at that city’s famous Fringe Festival in 2017 — just in time for Pride Week. Nanette finds Gadsby, who is gay, reorienting our view of who gets to be angry onstage and make people uncomfortable; who gets to dish it, and who has to sit there and take it. The special is very funny, but it almost feels inaccurate to call it a comedy show. It’s more like a humorous treatise on comedy and how it can normalize the status quo. Nanette was released on Netflix on June 19, but don’t miss your chance to see this powerfully compelling show live.

—Lara Zarum

Comedy

Los Profesores: ¡En Vacaciones!   + Hockey Cops

This cheery, daft, trenchant bilingual comedy show kicks off with a can’t-miss conceit and then only gets cheerier, dafter, more trenchant — and funnier. Upbeat young Spanish teachers Pedro Alcocer and Erica Hernandez are here to teach the audience the real Spanish, the Spanish we might need on a trip to Latin America. Their model: The blandly upbeat dialogos in American Spanish classes, where two speakers work dutifully through basic vocabulary in settings like la bibliotecha. (Always la bibliotecha!) Writers/performers Alcocer and Hernandez tear through each line in both Spanish and English, creating fresh, surprising comedy out of cognates, conjugation, adjective order, and how to really roll those Rs when pronouncing gonorrea. The show’s a dizzy, fizzing duet, profane as hell and also sweetly earnest, relentlessly inventive and wholly unpredictable. This week, ¡En Vacaciones! is paired with Hockey Cops, a sketch show about two cops who conduct their business on roller blades — and starring two comics, Matthew Van Orden and Andrew Ashbrook Freed, who have serious skating skills.

—Alan Scherstuhl and Lara Zarum

Thu

6/28

Music

The Blues Project Featuring Dorrance Dance With Toshi Reagon & BIGLovely

Photo: Em Watson

A strong and lucid voice in the new film American Tap, Michelle Dorrance is one of the collaborators on this superb show that delighted at the Joyce three summers ago. Here it’s free (though they’ll happily accept your donation), and includes the work of musical collaborators Toshi Reagon and her quintet BIGLovely; dance collaborators Derick K. Grant and Dormeshia Sumbry-Edwards; and Dorrance’s company of loose-limbed, powerful tap dancers.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Film

Ludwig

“Ludwig, you are the favorite of the Lord because more than any other man, you are exposed to sin.” A compassionate priest says this to the mad king of Bavaria about halfway through Ludwig, Luchino Visconti’s sprawling 1973 film, which is being given a weeklong rerelease at the Film Society of Lincoln Center, as part of its broader Visconti retrospective. You could take the priest’s statement and replace either “the Lord” or “Ludwig” with “Visconti,” that most godlike of directors — a towering figure who exerted total control over his impeccably lovely frames. But he was also a complicated man who clearly identified with Ludwig’s extravagance, his obsession with opera, his lightly hidden homosexuality, his flaunting of tradition. Visconti loved contradictory, tormented characters, who seemed to reflect his own angst back at him.

Bilge Ebiri

Comedy

Hannah Gadsby: Nanette

After a successful run of shows earlier this spring, Australian comedian Hannah Gadsby is back with her explosive stand-up special Nanette — the winner of the Edinburgh Comedy Award at that city’s famous Fringe Festival in 2017 — just in time for Pride Week. Nanette finds Gadsby, who is gay, reorienting our view of who gets to be angry onstage and make people uncomfortable; who gets to dish it, and who has to sit there and take it. The special is very funny, but it almost feels inaccurate to call it a comedy show. It’s more like a humorous treatise on comedy and how it can normalize the status quo. Nanette was released on Netflix on June 19, but don’t miss your chance to see this powerfully compelling show live.

—Lara Zarum

Music

Lucia Cadotsch

Zürich-born, Berlin-based jazz singer Lucia Cadotsch has been busy reinvigorating ye olde Great American Songbook as part of Speak Low. Accompanied by Otis Sandsjö, a saxophonist whose raw embellishment consists of overblown notes and looping ostinatos à la Colin Stetson, and Petter Eldh, a double-bassist who attacks his instrument as though he were wrestling an alligator to the ground, Cadotsch focuses her clear, strong voice on tunes that might have seemed played out a couple of decades ago. On the same playground as the Thing with Neneh Cherry, Speak Low perform tunes like Henry Mancini’s “Slow Hot Wind,” Nina Simone’s “Ain’t Got No, I Got Life,” and Kurt Weill’s “Speak Low” as rediscovered artifacts from a pile of nuclear rubble, dusting them off and coolly assaying their former glory.

Richard Gehr

Fri

6/29

Music

Branford Marsalis + Roger Guenveur Smith: Frederick Douglass Now

Photo: Roger Guenveur Smith; Marc Campos/Occidental College

It’s a Marsalis sandwich: Two sets from that stalwart, funky sax man Branford Marsalis and his working quartet (Joey Calderazzo, Eric Revis, and Justin Faulkner), with Roger Guenveur Smith’s spoken-word, rap-inflected Frederick Douglass Now show in between. Expect truth-telling as ferocious as the band’s virtuosity.

Alan Scherstuhl

Dance

Contemporary Dance Series

Tiffany Rea-Fisher curates free outdoor concerts starting June 22, with multiple dance companies performing nightly on an elevated stage. Assemble a picnic and join the crowds this Friday for a long look at Graham2, Eryc Taylor Dance, the AThomasProject, and dancers from Harlem School of the Arts.  On June 29, catch Mindy Jackson, NOW Dance Project, Clifton Brown, and the Peridance Contemporary Dance Company. The July 6 roster includes Tina Croll + Company, Kate Weare Compay, KineticArchitecture Dance, Bryn Cohn + Artists, and Diva Dance. The series concludes with Hope Boykin Dance, Julia Ehrstrand, Gabrielle Lamb, and Earl Mosely Institute of the Arts on July 20.

Elizabeth Zimmer

Comedy

Hannah Gadsby: Nanette

After a successful run of shows earlier this spring, Australian comedian Hannah Gadsby is back with her explosive stand-up special Nanette — the winner of the Edinburgh Comedy Award at that city’s famous Fringe Festival in 2017 — just in time for Pride Week. Nanette finds Gadsby, who is gay, reorienting our view of who gets to be angry onstage and make people uncomfortable; who gets to dish it, and who has to sit there and take it. The special is very funny, but it almost feels inaccurate to call it a comedy show. It’s more like a humorous treatise on comedy and how it can normalize the status quo. Nanette was released on Netflix on June 19, but don’t miss your chance to see this powerfully compelling show live.

—Lara Zarum

Film

Relaxer

Joel Potrykus, out of Grand Rapids, Michigan, is one of the great punks of the independent film world. His scuzzy, crude, defiantly tasteless comedies, so smart and mordant, are as concentrated as a dose of 5-hour Energy, and leave an aftertaste that is similarly acerbic. His breakthrough feature, Buzzard (2014), was a ferocious character study of a slacker on a quest for self-annihilation, as well as a subversive portrait of class in America. He returns to BAM this year with Relaxer, an even funnier, nastier, and more abrasive film, not about class but about culture. It’s an apocalypse story that pins the end of days to the turn of the millennium, whose anxieties manifest in ways both frightening and outrageously perverse — from piss to Pac-Man, from Faygo to Jerry Maguire, the cacophonous gnarly lot of it colliding into something wildly, happily unique.

Calum Marsh