On the Rumba River: Papa Wendo's Story

A light touch for a Congolese musical hero

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On the Rumba River
Directed by Jacques Sarasin
First Run Features
Opens June 6, Village East

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You've never heard of him, but Antoine Kolosoy, a/k/a Wendo, a/k/a Papa Wendo, is perhaps the most beloved musician that the Democratic Republic of Congo (a/k/a Zaire, a/k/a Belgian Congo) has ever known. The peripatetic Wendo got his start as a teenager, traveling up and down the Congo River as a mechanic, boxer, and part-time musician. He ascended to the ranks of the mono-named in 1948, when his first album became a massive hit and established him as the father of a new genre: Congolese Rumba. After 12 years of megastardom, though, the rise of the dictator Mobutu Sese Seko in the '60s reduced Wendo to homelessness—until he was rediscovered in the '90s. With On the Rumba River, yachtsman-cum- documentarian Jacques Sarasin has compiled a meditative ramble through the highlights of Wendo's career, told entirely through song and interviews with Wendo's musician-colleagues. As a filmmaker, Sarasin has an extraordinarily light touch—a good thing for those who want to sit back and enjoy the music (the toe-tappingly spirited rendition of Wendo's biggest hit, "Marie-Louise," is a highlight), a bad thing for viewers unfamiliar with Congolese history and in need of a little context with their rumba.

 
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